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The Cody family in front of the Irma Hotel.

The Cody family in front of the Irma Hotel.Thirteen things you probably didn’t know about Buffalo Bill Cody

CODY, Wyo., April 12, 2018 – He was the most interesting man in the world long before that Dos Equis guy. Buffalo Bill Cody entertained a queen, founded a town and championed the rights of women, children and minorities. Historians are fascinated by his quirky, colorful life. And nearly 1 million travelers from around the world, intent on experiencing a great American adventure, visit the town he built just outside of Yellowstone National Park every year.

Thousands of Cody Yellowstone Country visitors will learn about Buffalo Bill’s life and times as they explore the Smithsonian-affiliated Buffalo Bill Center of the West, experience the always-entertaining Cody Nite Rodeo and visit historic attractions like Pahaska Tepee, his hunting lodge at the entrance to Yellowstone National Park, and the Irma Hotel, which he built in 1902 and named after his daughter.  While visitors will certainly leave with a better understanding of the life and times of Buffalo Bill Cody, it is difficult to absorb a complete picture of a man who was legendary even in his own time.

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The Colonel was known for his generosity.

Here are some nuggets of Buffalo Bill Cody’s life that are not widely known:

On the tail end of a lengthy hunting trip throughout the West in 1902, he pulled his six-horse stagecoach to a stop in front of Salt Lake City’s Templeton Hotel and registered for a room. He signed the hotel register “W.F. Cody, Buffalo Bill,” and in the space to list his residence, merely wrote “the world.”

We were this close to having a Buffalo Bill Comstock. While employed as a hunter to supply bison meat to railroad workers, Bill Cody engaged in an eight-hour competition with another hunter, Bill Comstock, to see who could shoot the most bison and earn the “Buffalo Bill” nickname. Cody shot 68 bison – about one every seven minutes, soundly beating Comstock’s total of 48 bison.

He was lousy with money. Although he built a fortune with his Wild West Show, he was a generous lender to friends on the down and out, and he made a series of bad investments that ultimately led to financial ruin. One of the final financial blows was in 1902 when he lost much of his Wild West profits in an unsuccessful mining venture in Arizona. He was deeply in debt when he died in 1917.

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Buffalo Bill with Sitting Bull.

He even tried his hand in journalism. Buffalo Bill started the Cody Enterprise in 1899, three years after founding the town of Cody, which had grown to a population of 300. The newspaper is still in operation today under the same masthead.

Buffalo Bill got his sense of fairness honestly. His father Isaac barely survived an 1853 stabbing following an antislavery speech he delivered in Fort Leavenworth, then part of the Kansas Territory. Pro-slavery sentiment in the town made life difficult for the Cody family, and at one point, a plot to murder Isaac was foiled when young William, not yet 10 years old, rode 30 miles to warn him of the plan.

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Located outside the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, “The Scout” depicts Cody as the legendary horseman that he was.

He became a household name because of an imaginative dime novelist. Learning of his feats as a hunter and scout, novelist Ned Buntline authored a book called “Buffalo Bill, the King of the Border Men,” the first of some 550 dime novels about the larger-than-life character.

Buffalo Bill’s life has inspired many artists, even long after his death. Mark Twain described his “Wild West Show” as the country’s most “distinctly American pop-culture export to the world.” F. Scott Fitzgerald combined the personalities of Buffalo Bill and Daniel Boone to create “Dan Cody,” a character in “The Great Gatsby.” Film director and screenwriter Sam Peckinpah had Buffalo Bill in mind when he created Randolph Scott’s character in “Ride the High Country.” Even the Beatles found inspiration in their lighthearted, satirical song “The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill.”

Upon his death in Colorado, his estranged wife Louisa sold his body for $10,000. The publisher of the Denver Post and the city of Denver bought the rights to bury Buffalo Bill’s body. The Buffalo Bill Grave and Museum in Golden may – or may not – be his final burial place, though. Some Cody residents still believe the story about an elaborate plot to steal his body from the mortuary and return it to Cody where he wanted to be buried.

Prominent friends formed the Buffalo Bill Memorial Association shortly after his death. Through the association, they secured funding from the Wyoming Legislature and commissioned sculptor Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney to create “The Scout,” a bronze sculpture that stands at the entrance to the Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

Cody was a Freemason who achieved the rank of Knight Templar in 1889 and 32-degree rank in the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry in 1894.

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The Buffalo Bill Center of West is affiliated with the Smithsonian and is five museums under one roof.

Cody was an ardent supporter of rights for women and minorities, and he insisted on equal pay for all members of his traveling shows, regardless of gender. “What we want to do is give women even more liberty than they have,” he once said. “Let them do any kind of work they see fit, and if they do it as well as men, give them equal pay.”

Buffalo Bill received a Medal of Honor while serving the Third Cavalry Regiment as a civilian scout. Congress later rescinded the medal, as well as all others awarded to civilians. In 1989, Cody’s medal was officially reinstated.

He was known as a fearless Indian fighter, but he was also a committed advocate for the rights of American Indians. He once said, “Every Indian outbreak that I have ever known has resulted from broken promises and broken treaties by the government.”

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

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The Chief Joseph Scenic Byway. – Photo by J.L. “Woody” Wooden

Great American Road Trip: Cody Yellowstone Country

 

CODY, Wyo., April 2, 2018 – There is no uninteresting route to northwestern Wyoming’s Cody Yellowstone Country. From every direction, travelers bound for Yellowstone Country drive along scenic byways and highways, pass historically significant sites and spot wildlife roaming free in a wild northwestern Wyoming region that is home to the world’s first national park.

“Yellowstone Country has been a Great American Adventure destination for generations, with road-trippers traveling from near and far to see bison and bears, experience the cowboy culture of Cody and view the geothermal features of Yellowstone National Park,” said Claudia Wade, executive director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of the destination that includes the towns of Cody, Powell, Meeteetse and the valley east of Yellowstone. “This is a region with many surprises around the next bend, and we urge travelers to slow down and savor the experience of getting here.”

And if guests haven’t had enough road-tripping by the time they arrive in Cody, they can always embark on one of these five scenic driving tours from Cody:

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Wildflowers along the Beartooth Highway.

Beartooth Loop

Heading north from Cody through the rolling grasslands on Wyoming Highway 120, drivers will pass by the west side of Heart Mountain, a local landmark, before turning onto the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway, Wyoming Highway 296. Continuing west over the historic Sunlight Creek Bridge – the highest bridge in the state – travelers should watch for moose and waterfowl as well as a 1,200-foot gorge between the granite Beartooth Plateau and the volcanic Absaroka Mountains. Turning right onto U.S. 212 – also known as the Beartooth Highway – drivers will learn why commentator Charles Kuralt dubbed the road “the most beautiful drive in America.” Continuing on to Red Lodge, Mont., travelers will see Beartooth Butte and pass many trout-rich ponds and lakes dotting the area before driving the Beartooth Pass, the highest road in Wyoming. To continue the loop, drivers should turn east at Red Lodge onto Montana 308 and proceed through the old coal-mining town of Bear Creek to Belfry, Mont. Upon turning south on Montana 72/Wyoming 120, drivers follow the base of the Beartooth Mountains and Clark’s Fork Canyon before returning to Cody.

Detours – In addition to stopping at the Sunlight Creek Bridge, a popular stop is Red Lodge, Mont., a friendly and historic mining town.

Bighorn Basin Loop

This route begins with Wyoming Highway 120 south through the town of Meeteetse and to Thermopolis. Turning north onto U.S. 20 to the town of Worland – the agricultural hub of the region – and then taking U.S. 16 east to the town of Ten Sleep, visitors will be treated to a spectacular view of the Bighorn Mountains. Heading north on Norwood Road, drivers will skirt the base of the Bighorns before joining Wyoming 31 and connecting to U.S. 16-20 from the town of Manderson to the town of Basin. Drivers will pass through fertile ranch and farm lands of the Greybull River Valley on Wyoming 30 west before picking up Wyoming Highway 120 again and returning to Cody.

Detours – In Thermopolis, home of the world’s largest free-flowing hot springs, travelers can stop at Hot Springs State Park to soak in mineral hot pools or visit the Wyoming Dinosaur Center and Dig Sites, also in Thermopolis.

Bighorn Mountain Loop

This route begins on U.S. 14A and heads northeast through the towns of Powell and Lovell, past the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area Visitor Center and to Burgess Junction. From there, drivers head south onto U.S. 14 along the west slope of the Bighorn Mountains and through wildlife-rich meadowlands before arriving at the town of Greybull, which derives its name from a legendary albino bison bull that was sacred to American Indians. U.S. Highway 14-16-20 continues west to Cody and offers terrific views of the Absaroka Mountains to the west and Heart Mountain to the north.

Detours – Explore the Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center between Cody and Powell for a moving lesson in U.S. history. The Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, home to 120 free-roaming wild horses, is a short detour from the Wild Horse Range Visitor Center. On a three-mile access road off 14A between Burgess Junction and Bighorn Lake, visitors will find Medicine Wheel, a mysterious 74-foot stone circle with 28 spokes that some think had religious or astronomical meaning to an ancient Indian tribe.

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Wildlife is spotted often from the roads in Cody Yellowstone Country.

East Yellowstone Loop

This route heads to Yellowstone National Park via the U.S. Highway 14-16-20 along the North Fork of the Shoshone River past the Buffalo Bill Reservoir and through the scenic East Yellowstone Valley and the Shoshone National Forest to Pahaska Tepee, Buffalo Bill’s original hunting lodge. Entering the park through the East Gate, travelers can explore the eastern half of the park and exit via the Northeast Gate and Cooke City and connecting to U.S. Highway 212. Along the way, visitors will pass Yellowstone Lake, Fishing Bridge, the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River and Tower Falls before driving through Lamar Valley, known as “America’s Serengeti” because of its abundance of wildlife. From Cooke City, drivers will trace the route taken by Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce Indians in 1877 as they fled the U.S. Army. Highway US 212 connects to Wyoming Highway 296 – the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway – and drops to the valley of Clarks Fork of the Yellowstone River. Continuing on Wyoming 296, drivers climb Dead Indian Pass, with dramatic vistas of the Clarks Fork Canyon and Sunlight Basin, before connecting to Wyoming 120 and returning to Cody.

Detours – Yellowstone is full of viewpoints, historic sites and architecture and wildlife. The Lower Falls of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River shouldn’t be missed. Documented by photographer William Henry Jackson and in paintings by Thomas Moran, the beauty of the falls helped inspired Congress to designate the world’s first national park.

South Fork Trip

A good option for Cody visitors with limited time, the half-day drive begins on Wyoming 291 a short drive west of Cody’s Buffalo Bill Center of the West and skirts Cedar Mountain before heading toward the Buffalo Bill Reservoir. The route continues along the South Fork of the Shoshone River and past Buffalo Bill Cody’s original TE Ranch, built in 1895. The road dead-ends near Deer Creek Campground.

Detours – Deer Creek Campground is a desirable place for a picnic lunch, and travelers will likely see abundant pronghorn, elk and deer along the way.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

 

 

Spring is Around the Corner in Cody Yellowstone Country,   and so are the Cubs, Calves and Pups

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CODY, Wyo., March 1, 2018 – Spring is a time of rebirth, and many wildlife species in Cody/Yellowstone Country embrace that idea literally.

Although the first day of spring is March 21, for most residents of northwestern Wyoming’s Cody – situated east of Yellowstone National Park – the season truly begins when the babies make their debut. For some species, that is still a couple of months away.

“Around here, the spring starts when the first bear cub is spotted,” said Claudia Wade, executive director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of the region. “We typically start to see mature bears sometime in March and mothers with their cubs in April and May. By the time our summer-season visitors begin to arrive, those cubs will have begun to learn the ropes of living in the Yellowstone wilderness.”

The first cub-spotting is a big deal in Cody Yellowstone, and the word spreads fast when someone sees a young bear ambling along the road or running through a valley with its mother, said Wade.

Yellowstone Country wildlife

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Wolves were reintroduced to the region more than 20 years ago.

Bison calves are often the first of the young ones to make their debut. Reddish-colored, fuzzy-furred bison calves are quick studies, and they can keep up with their mothers as soon as two hours after birth. It takes a village to protect a bison calf, and all adult bison surround young calves when predators such as wolves and bears are near.

Black bear cubs are born during the winter, and they spend the first couple of months of their lives nursing and dozing while their semiconscious mamas continue to slumber in their dens until they emerge in the spring. Mothers spend the next 16 to 18 months teaching their babies how to survive in the wild.

Moose cows aren’t quite as patient with their young. Once they give birth to a new calf – typically in May or June – they chase away the previous season’s calves. While not known for their intelligence, moose are predictably unpredictable, particularly when protecting a calf. Moose cows will chase human observers and other wildlife if they perceive a threat. Moose are frequently spotted near the northeast and east entrances to Yellowstone.

Bighorn sheep produce one or two lambs annually. Born in May or June, the lambs immediately begin the multi-year process of growing their horns. For this species, size matters. The horns on male Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep can weigh as much as 40 pounds, and the size of horns can influence a ram’s rank in the herd.

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Elk are found throughout Cody/Yellowstone Country.

Elk thrive throughout Yellowstone Country, particularly in East Yellowstone Valley along the north fork of the Shoshone River. Usually born in late May and June, elk calves like most ungulates can walk within an hour or two of birth. An elk cow’s protective strategy when predators are near is to run away in hopes the predator will follow her and not notice the newborn lying motionless in the grass.

Wolf pups begin appearing in April and May, and their packs will remain with them for three to 10 weeks as they learn bit by bit how to be a wolf in Yellowstone. Their playful antics with their littermates make wolf-watching in spring especially fun. While wolves roam throughout the greater Yellowstone region, the best sightings are often in the Lamar Valley inside the park.

River otters are also born with an entertainer’s spirit, but they are a little harder to spot. Born in March and April, these aquatic nomads stay with their moms for a year as they learn how to find fish and other food and swim underwater for minutes at a time.

Eagles emerge in mid-April and fly from their nests three to four months after that. This remarkable once-endangered bird is one of 19 raptor species in the park. Northwestern Wyoming is home to bald eagles and golden eagles. Bald eagles feed on fish, and their nests can often be found in trees close to water. Golden eagles are more frequently spotted in valleys where they can accommodate their preference for rabbits and other small mammals.

Tours and tips

The best place to start when embarking on a Yellowstone Country wildlife excursion is the Draper Natural History Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in downtown Cody. The museum offers award-winning exhibits that showcase the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem and provides travelers with knowledge about what to look for and where to look.

Cody is home to several tour companies that offer wildlife tours in Yellowstone National Park and throughout the region. Visitors who prefer to self-guide are guaranteed a scenic ride along one of the five wildlife loop tours from Cody.

Travelers will find an array of overnight accommodations, from boutique inns to guest ranches, that provide a comfortable home away from home.

Above all, observe safely

Wade advises visitors to keep binoculars handy and to strictly observe recommendations to stay at least 100 yards away from bears and wolves and 25 yards away from all other wildlife. “While most visitors by far observe wildlife in a safe and respectful way, we do have incidents of visitors and animals injured because travelers got too close,” said Wade. “So, it bears repeating. This is not a zoo. It is one of the wildest places in the country.”

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags:  #YellowstoneCountry  #CodyWyoming  #CenteroftheWest  #BuffaloBill  #Yellowstone  #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

 

1Ten Tips for Planning a Summer Vacation in Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

CODY, Wyo., February 21, 2018 – A Cody/Yellowstone Country vacation can be a trip of a lifetime, one that will be remembered forever by every member of the family. To maximize the experiences, Claudia Wade of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of this northwestern Wyoming region, shares these tips for a fun and memorable vacation in Yellowstone Country.

“The best time to plan a summer trip to Cody/Yellowstone Country is early in the year, when there is still plenty of room availability and travelers can choose the best option for their travel style and budget,” said Wade. “And a little time spent on the Cody/Yellowstone Country website will help potential travelers determine the adventures that appeal to them the most, so they begin building a flexible itinerary that will make everyone in the group happy.”

  1. Choose where to lay your head and make reservations soon. Cody/Yellowstone is home to an array of dude and guest ranches, Bed and Breakfasts, luxury hotels, boutique inns and cabins. A complete listing of lodging can be found online.
  1. Travel before June 20 for the best lodging availability.  Most of the region’s summer-season attractions like the Cody Nite Rodeo and Cody Trolley Tours kick off June 1, but travelers – especially those with school-age kids – don’t typically start hitting the road in droves until after mid-June. “Those of us who have lived here for years can practically guess the date by the number of visitors on Sheridan Avenue,” said Wade. “The visitor floodgates open after the middle of June, so early-June visitors will find plenty of room availability and fewer travelers in museums and on tours.”
  1. Take the Cody Trolley Tour, ideally at the beginning of a visit.  This fun and informative one-hour tour travels around the town and as far as the Buffalo Bill Dam while an on-board
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    Wildlife viewing in the summer includes wild mustangs as well as grizzly bears, elk and more.

    narrator introduces riders to the town’s attractions, history and legends.

  1. Visit the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Capping the west end of Sheridan Avenue – Cody’s main street – this sprawling facility with five museums under one roof should be on every visitor’s must-do list. Travelers heading to the park will find the Draper Natural History Museum to be a great pre-trip orientation, as exhibits showcase the wildlife and natural history of the Great Yellowstone ecosystem. The other museums are the Buffalo Bill Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney Western Art Museum and Cody Firearms Museum.
  1. Tour Yellowstone with an expert. With 2.2 million acres, five entrances, abundant free-roaming wildlife and geothermal features unlike any other place on Earth, a visit to Yellowstone National Park can be a bit overwhelming. Several companies offer daily and multi-day tours with on-board guides who share details about the park’s furry residents, hot spots and other natural wonders.
  1. Practice safe viewing. Most Cody/Yellowstone Country visitors will see wildlife such as bison, bighorn sheep and elk along the road. For roadside sightings, Wade reminds travelers wishing to stop pull completely off roads — ideally in a pull-out — and use binoculars for the best views. Travelers should stay at least 25 yards away from most wildlife and at least 100 yards from predators like bears and wolves.
  1. Experience the Cody Nite Rodeo, especially this yearwhen this authentic Western attraction is celebrating its 80th season. The longest running summer-season nightly rodeo in the country,
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    The Cody Nite Rodeo runs from the beginning of June until the end of August.

    Cody Nite Rodeo is a fun and memorable experience for the entire family.

  1. Pack smart. Weather in Cody Yellowstone Country can vary greatly throughout the summer, and travelers should be ready for temperatures that typically range from the 70s to the 40s. Visitors should also plan for a high-altitude experience and bring plenty of sunscreen and refillable water bottles to stay hydrated.
  1. Dine around. As travelers might expect, there are plenty of places to find a great steak, but there are also restaurants that specialize in local and sustainable food, ethnic cuisine, sandwiches and diner fare.
  1. Live the history. Numerous attractions showcase the history of the region, including Old Trail Town and Museum of the Old West, Buffalo Bill Dam & Visitor Center and the powerful Heart Mountain World War II Interpretive Center – the site of an incarceration camp were 14,000 Japanese-Americans were imprisoned during World War II.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

Climbing Legend Conrad Anker to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award, Speak at Cody Ice Festival in February

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CODY, Wyo., Feb. 1, 2018 – The Cody Ice Festival will present the Jack Roberts Lifetime Achievement award to climbing legend Conrad Anker at the Cody auditorium Friday, February 9, 2018.

A climber, mountaineer and author, Anker is the captain of the North Face Global Athlete climbing team with several first ascents to his credit, including Shark’s Fin, one of the last unclimbed Himalayan peaks. He has summited Mount Everest three times, including once without supplemental oxygen.

Anker will be the featured speaker after receiving the award.

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Conrad Anker will address the festival and be recognized with a lifetime achievement award.

The Roberts award for “excellence in the mountains and contributions to alpinism” was established by the Cody Ice Fest in 2017, and the first recipient was the late Scott Adamson. Jack Roberts was a longtime friend and mentor to the climbing community around the world.

There is still time to register for the 20th-annual Cody Ice Festival, to be held Feb. 8-11, 2018 in Cody/Yellowstone Country. With a line-up of affordable clinics for beginners, experienced climbers and women only, the festival promises the biggest ice of any festival in North America.

The popular festival features ice climbing clinics by day and nightly speakers and presentations developed to inspire and encourage festival participants. In the evenings, there are nightly raffles for ice climbing gear and bottomless beer pours with the purchase of a pint glass.

“The Cody Ice Fest promotes safety, stewardship, education and camaraderie in a positive and professional environment,” said Ari Novak, director of the Cody Ice Festival for the second year. “This is one of those sports where you can find yourself receiving a climbing tip from a star like Conrad Anker during the day and sharing a joke with him and others in the evening when everyone is winding down.”

Established in 1998, the festival offers world-class instruction through on-ice clinics in one of the most exciting ice climbing venues in the world.

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Climbers of all abilities are welcome.

Clinics

Each clinic is led by a top professional mountain guide and a professional athlete. Clinics range in price from $150 to $200, and there is also a free ice climbing day on Sunday priced at $25. Active members of the military and veterans receive a 10 percent discount off the price of the clinics.

The festival will include clinics for advanced climbers and beginners as well as all-female clinics taught by female athletes.

World-Class Ice Climbing Region

Ice routes can be found in the North and South Forks of the Shoshone, the region to the west of the town of Cody, Wyo. The South Fork of the Shoshone is home to the highest concentration of frozen waterfalls in the United States, with more than 200 climbable pitches within a 10-mile radius. Cody is home to plenty of long moderate and advanced ice routes offering a memorable experience for climbers of all abilities.

Commercially guided ice climbing made its debut in 2011 in Shoshone National Forest outside of Cody, Wyo. as the National Forest Service issued the first permits to outfitters to lead ice-climbing trips.

The region is comprised of porous volcanic soil that allows for easy water seepage. The mountains receive large amounts of snow that melts into a high number of drainages. These factors result in spring-fed waterfalls that are constantly regenerating themselves and freezing into high-quality ice climbs. Climbers are still discovering new waterfalls in the region, and some have made dozens of “first ascents” over the past few years.

More About the Festival

The Cody Ice Festival will offer participants discounted rates at Cody-area hotels and transportation to the climbs.

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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

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This is the Year to Experience the Cody Stampede in Cody/Yellowstone Country. Here’s Why.

 

CODY, Wyo., January 23, 2018 – The small town of Cody, Wyoming celebrates July 4 with five days of parades, fairs and the four-day Cody Stampede Rodeo, and when the big day falls on a weekend or a Monday or Friday, many of the travelers frequently turn the holiday into a long weekend getaway.

With this year’s Independence Day in the middle of the week, however, the town anticipates fewer short-getaway visitors. That means road trippers taking longer vacations will find more lodging options, better rodeo seats and fewer people watching parades and strolling through the outdoor fairs.

Long-time director of the Park County Travel Council Claudia Wade has observed the pattern for years. “Instead of parade-watchers six deep on the sidewalks, travelers can easily find front-row seats to watch the parades,” said Wade. “While our small town celebrates July 4 in a very big way, when the holiday falls midweek like this year, the atmosphere is typically a little less frenetic than usual.

Park County Travel Council is the marketing arm of the region.

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Stampede parades will take place July 3 and 4.

Event Lineup

The Cody Stampede events kick off this year with the Cody/Yellowstone Extreme Bulls event on Saturday, June 30. The fun continues Sunday, July 1 through Wednesday, July 4 with four Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA)-sanctioned Stampede Rodeos. Visitors and locals alike overload on cuteness watching the annual Kiddies Parade, this year scheduled for Monday, July 2. Stampede Rodeos are set for Tuesday and Wednesday, July 3 and 4.

There’s also a 5K/10K run/walk on July 4, and the three-day Wild Extravaganza Craft Fair July 2-4.  Additionally, visitors will find a variety of musical performances by regional acts in outdoor venues throughout town.

The Stampede Parades on July 3 and 4 are especially fun, with at least three marching bands from around the country parading down Sheridan Avenue, Cody’s main street. The parade’s 2018 grand marshal will be announced soon. Last year’s grand marshals were actors Robert Taylor and Adam Bartley, who play Sheriff Walt Longmire and Deputy Archie “The Ferg” Ferguson in the A&E “Longmire” series. Past grand marshals have included storyteller Red Steagall, John Wayne, Steven Seagal, Chuck Yeager and Wilford Brimley.

3Stampede History

The Cody Stampede is marking its 99th year in 2018. The Stampede got its start when a group of local leaders including a lawyer, dude ranch owner, newspaper editor and a publicity-savvy and nationally known female novelist met three years after the death of Buffalo Bill Cody to talk about how to transform the town’s small annual July 4 celebration into an event that would showcase Cody’s authentic Western dude ranches and other attractions as well as its proximity to two entrances to Yellowstone National Park.

Among the most vocal of those leaders – and the only female present – was Caroline Lockhart, whose best-selling novels in the early 1900s had earned her fame and fortune. Once the group settled on naming the event the Cody Stampede and sketched a general framework, Lockhart took the reins as president. She set about publicizing it in the Park County Enterprise – Buffalo Bill’s newspaper, which was later renamed the Cody Enterprise, and is still in operation today. She also organized fundraisers and invited famous rodeo performers to demonstrate their skills at the nightly rodeos.

These town leaders had little idea that they would create an annual event that would be enjoyed and remembered by generations of Cody residents and visitors from around the world.

Visiting during the Cody Stampede

Even with the fortunate July 4 timing this year, Wade advises travelers to plan soon if they want to experience the Cody Stampede. The town’s inns, lodges, hotels and guest ranches offer more than 1,600 rooms, so visitors will find plenty of lodging choices.

Visitors will find an array of activities to keep them engaged when not enjoying Cody Stampede events. Among them, the Sleeping Giant Ski Area Zip Line, Cody Firearms Experience, Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue, Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Old Trail Town and the Cody Trolley Tour. There are also many outdoor adventures such as hiking, rock climbing fly fishing and whitewater rafting.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

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Old Trail Town

Cody/Yellowstone Country on a Budget; Free and Moderately Priced Experiences (And a Few Splurge-Worthy Ones Too)

 

CODY, Wyo., January 18, 2018 – Vacationers seeking a high-adventure vacation with a low-budget price tag should plan a trip to northwestern Wyoming’s Cody/Yellowstone Country this summer. Home to an array of authentic Western experiences and offering easy access to Yellowstone National Park, the region offers affordable fun for families, couples, athletes, history buffs, music-lovers and solitude-seekers.

“Fun doesn’t have to cost a fortune in Yellowstone Country,” said Claudia Wade, executive director of the Park County Travel Council, the region’s marketing arm. “With a variety of free and moderately priced adventures, the region offers incredible value for budget-minded travelers.”

With all the money saved, travelers might also want to select a splurge-worthy adventure or two, Wade added.

Cody/Yellowstone Country is home to a wide range of accommodations – from campsites to luxury inns – and travelers who book lodging early have the best choices.

Here are some examples of free and moderately priced experiences (under $30 per person) in Yellowstone Country:

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Locals named this rock formation Henry Ford Rock.

Free activities:

  • Find “Snoopy the Dog” or “Laughing Pig Rock.” The Buffalo Bill Scenic Byway between Cody and the east entrance to Yellowstone National Park has abundant and very weird rock formations and lava flows that have been imaginatively named by locals.
  • Watch the wacky Wild Bunch perform a “gunfight” with a gun safety message. The place to be on summer evenings is outside the Irma Hotel to watch this supremely entertaining group of actors engage in Western skits that always end up in a gunfight. Want a guaranteed seat? Buy a reserved seat for $2 through Cody Trolley Tours, which departs from the same location.
  • See Buffalo Bill Cody’s hunting lodge, Pahaska Tepee. This is where Buffalo Bill went to relax with friends such as Teddy Roosevelt and the Prince of Monaco. Built in 1904, this hunting lodge sits just outside the East Gate of Yellowstone National Park.
  • If there’s someone in the group who likes to see how things work, stop at the Buffalo Bill Dam Visitor Center, located six miles west of Cody. Water was as much a concern in the days of Buffalo Bill Cody as it is in the West today.  Cody foresaw that and convinced the U.S. government to build a dam to help conserve that precious resource.
  • View fine Western art created by local artists at the Cody Country Art League, which shares a historic building – the original Buffalo Bill Museum – with the Cody Visitor Center. Artists with ties to the community display photography, oil and watercolor paintings, sculptures and more.
  • Stroll through history while viewing hundreds of relic guns and other weapons at the Cody Dug Up Gun Museum. This fun and funky museum presents weapons from many periods in American history.
  • Meeteetse Museums is comprised of the Meeteetse Museum, Charles Belden Museum of Western Photography and Bank Museum. The museums house an extensive collection of historic
    3

    Pahaska TePee was Buffalo Bill Cody’s hunting lodge.

    items and host a variety of free tours such as the Legend Rock Tour, which explores hundreds of ancient petroglyphs.

  • Strap on your walking shoes and hike, stroll and explore downtown Cody and some of the many hiking trails that surround the town. Cody features a variety of shops and artists galleries that welcome window shopping visitors.
  • See a bison, bear, eagle, bighorn sheep, river otter, fox, coyote, elk or wolf in the wild. Spotting wildlife is free, and visitors typically don’t have to go far to see an array of species. Tip: bring binoculars wherever you go and practice safe viewing by leaving plenty of distance from the animal.
  • Enjoy a free concert in Cody’s City Park. Every Thursday evening in July and August the City of Cody sponsors a concert at the band shell in the centrally located park. Picnic baskets, chairs and blankets are encouraged.
  • The recently renovated Historic Cody Mural and Museum depicts scenes of early history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Painted by Edward T. Grigware, the elaborate mural stretches to the visitor center rotunda. The museum includes items brought to Wyoming by Mormon pioneers.
  • The Homesteader Museum in nearby Powell is a collection of exhibits showing the world of pioneers, including renovated homesteader cabins, tools, photographs and other artifacts depicting the rugged life of a Wyoming homesteader.

Moderately priced experiences:

  • Visit Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center, where 14,000 Japanese-American citizens were incarcerated following Japan’s bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. The Interpretive Center
    4

    There are plentiful hiking trails throughout Cody/Yellowstone Country.

    includes thoughtfully presented exhibits that explore that difficult period of the country’s history, and it is a must-see stop for students of American history, young and old. Admission: $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors.

  • Western history buffs will appreciate a visit to Old Trail Town/Museum of the Old West, an enclave of 26 authentic frontier buildings (one used by Butch Cassidy and his gang) and several gravesites, including that of the infamous Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston – portrayed by actor Robert Redford in the 1972 self-titled film. Admission: adults, $9; children 12 and younger, $5; seniors, $8 and groups of eight or more people, $6 per person.
  • The Cody Nite Rodeo begins its 80th season this year, and it is often travelers’ first rodeo experience. Open nightly from June 1 through August 31, the rodeo features riders, ropers, bull riders and bronc busters from all over the country. Admission: adults and teens, $20; children 7-12, $10; ages 6 and younger, free.
  • Download the Travel Storys app and take a walking tour of Cody. Created in partnership with the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, the audio includes insider tips and true Western tales. Downtown Cody, including Sheridan Ave. – the town’s main street – is highly walkable, with flat streets and many pedestrian-friendly stops.
  • Learn the history and geography of Cody during an hour-long Cody Trolley Tour. Guides entertainingly spin the tales of Cody’s evolution, from wild frontier town to authentic Western vacation destination. Tickets are $27 for adults and $15 for children. Several tours are offered daily throughout the summer season.

Splurge-worthy Adventures

  • Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue, featuring authentic Western music, comedy and poetry, has been an entertainment staple for years. Miller and his Empty Saddles Band team up with the Buffalo Bill Center of the West to offer a dinner and show Monday through Saturday nights. Admission: $42 per person.
  • Take a guided tour of Yellowstone National Park. With 2.2 million acres, five entrances, abundant free-roaming wildlife and geothermal features unlike any other place on Earth, a visit to
    5

    Cody/Yellowstone Country is rich in wildlife.

    Yellowstone National Park is best explored with guides who share details about the park’s furry residents, hot spots and other natural wonders.

  • Go fishing with a guide. Cody Yellowstone Country is home to hundreds of fishing spots, and the region is known for its blue-ribbon trout fishing.
  • Soar above the Shoshone Forest and the North Fork of the Shoshone River on the Sleeping Giant Zipline. The zipline offers a range of prices including a family adventure package.
  • Rent a Jeep and explore the rugged backroad surrounding Cody Yellowstone Country.
  • Explore Cody/Yellowstone Country the way the early explorers did – on horseback. Numerous stables and dude and guest ranches offer equestrian experiences ranging from authentic week-long adventures to trail rides.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

 

 

President W Harding at Mammoth Hot Springs; Photographer unknown; 1923

President W Harding in Yellowstone.

From White House to Wyoming.

The Presidents Who Came to Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

CODY, Wyo., January 12, 2018 – Nearly every U.S. president since Ulysses S. Grant has visited the state of Wyoming before, during or after their terms in office. Of those presidents, several have ventured to the state’s northwestern region known as Cody/Yellowstone Country, which includes the town of Cody as well as parts of Yellowstone National Park.

“With the approach of President’s Day Weekend, it’s a good time to remember some of the adventures our country’s chief executives have experienced during visits to Cody/Yellowstone Country,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of the region. “Just like the travelers who visit from around the world each year, many of our presidents came simply to get away from day-to-day pressures and experience this authentic Western playground.”

One of those presidents was Chester A. Arthur, who visited Yellowstone Country in 1883 with a large entourage, intent on having an authentic Western experience.  Arthur was known to be bit of a dandy, and in a nod to Western style during a two-month vacation during his term, he covered his business suit with knee-length leather leggings. Arthur kept in touch with the outside world and engaged in presidential business by one daily mail courier on horseback who delivered and received Arthur’s messages.

Here are a few other examples of presidential visits to Cody/Yellowstone Country:

  • President Calvin Coolidge visited Cody on July 4, 1927 for the opening of the Buffalo Bill Museum, the first of five museums that comprise the Buffalo Bill Center of the West today. He also
    2

    Theodore Roosevelt dedicated the arch at the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park.

    attended the Cody Stampede, a July 4 Cody tradition that will celebrate its 99th season this year. While in the region, Coolidge ventured into Yellowstone National Park and stayed one night in the private home owned by Harry W. Child, owner of then-concessioner Yellowstone Park Company.

  • Theodore Roosevelt was a big fan of the state, and he made several trips during his presidential tenure and returned to Wyoming to vacation after he left Washington. The robust president was far more of a natural in Western-style clothing and activities than some of his predecessors. He was a frequent visitor to Yellowstone Country, and he made his final visit to the park in 1903 during a two-week vacation. During that trip, he laid the cornerstone for the park’s Roosevelt Arch, bearing the inscription: “For the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” Although the arch is in the state of Montana at the northern entrance to Yellowstone, Wyoming celebrates the grand structure too, as most of the park is in Wyoming.
  • Years later, Theodore’s fifth cousin Franklin took office, and he also left his mark on Yellowstone Country. Some would argue it wasn’t a positive mark, as it was Franklin Delano Roosevelt who signed Executive Order 9066 on Feb. 19, 1942. As a result, some 14,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated at the Heart Mountain Confinement Site during World War II. Another interesting tidbit about the publicity-conscious president: When he visited the park, he avoided the park hotels, many with multiple floors and no elevators, and instead was a guest of the lodge manager in his single-floor park home, which could better accommodate his wheelchair while at the same time keeping it from public view.
  • President Bill and first lady Hillary Clinton took a stroll around Old Faithful Geyser in 1995.
  • President Barack Obama and his family visited Yellowstone in 2009 and had lunch in the park’s Old Faithful Snow Lodge.
  • President Jimmy Carter fished in Lake Yellowstone and then returned to the park after his presidency and dined in the employee pub at the park’s Lake Lodge. He even signed the wall of the
    3

    Franklin Roosevelt signed the order creating Japanese American internment camps during WWII.

    pub, and his signature is still visible today.

  • President George H.W. Bush visited Yellowstone in 1989 to survey the devastation of the 1988 fires. Park officials briefed the president about fire science. Bush also fished in a river near Cody and visited Pahaska Tepee, Buffalo Bill Cody’s hunting lodge.
  • President Warren Harding visited the park in 1923, shortly before he died. Upon learning of his death, staff in the park named a geyser after him and observed a moment of silence in his honor.
  • Although he never visited Yellowstone, the country’s 18th president, Ulysses S. Grant, arguably had the most lasting impact on the region. In 1872, Grant signed the bill that designated Yellowstone as the world’s first national park, a move which is often called “ America’s Best Idea.”

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


1

Ten Tips for Planning a Summer Vacation in Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

CODY, Wyo., January 2, 2018 – A Cody/Yellowstone Country vacation can be a trip of a lifetime, one that will be remembered forever by every member of the family. To maximize the experiences, Claudia Wade of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of this northwestern Wyoming region, shares these tips for a fun and memorable vacation in Yellowstone Country.
 
“The best time to plan a summer trip to Cody/Yellowstone Country is in the winter, when there is still plenty of room availability and travelers can choose the best option for their travel style and budget,” said Wade. “And a little time spent on the Cody/Yellowstone Country website will help potential travelers determine the adventures that appeal to them the most, so they begin building a flexible itinerary that will make everyone in the group happy.”
 
1.      Choose where to lay your head and make reservations soon. Cody/Yellowstone is home to an array of dude and guest ranches, Bed and Breakfasts, luxury hotels, boutique inns and cabins. A complete listing of lodging can be found online.
 
2.      Travel before June 20 for the best lodging availability.  Most of the region’s summer-season attractions like the Cody Nite Rodeo and Cody Trolley Tours kick off June 1, but travelers – especially those with school-age kids – don’t typically start hitting the road in droves until after mid-June. “Those of us who have lived here for years can practically guess the date by the number of visitors on Sheridan Avenue,” said Wade. “The visitor floodgates open after the middle of June, so early-June visitors will find plenty of room availability and fewer travelers in museums and on tours.”
 
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Wildlife viewing in the summer includes grizzly bears, elk and more.

3.      Take the Cody Trolley Tour, ideally at the beginning of a visit.  This fun and informative one-hour tour travels around the town and as far as the Buffalo Bill Dam while an on-board narrator introduces riders to the town’s attractions, history and legends.
 
4.      Visit the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Capping the west end of Sheridan Avenue – Cody’s main street – this sprawling facility with five museums under one roof should be on every visitor’s must-do list. Travelers heading to the park will find the Draper Natural History Museum to be a great pre-trip orientation, as exhibits showcase the wildlife and natural history of the Great Yellowstone ecosystem. The other museums are the Buffalo Bill Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney Western Art Museum and Cody Firearms Museum.
 
5.      Tour Yellowstone with an expert. With 2.2 million acres, five entrances, abundant free-roaming wildlife and geothermal features unlike any other place on Earth, a visit to Yellowstone National Park can be a bit overwhelming. Several companies offer daily and multi-day tours with on-board guides who share details about the park’s furry residents, hot spots and other natural wonders.
 
6.      Practice safe viewing. Most Cody/Yellowstone Country visitors will see wildlife such as bison, bighorn sheep and elk along the road. For roadside sightings, Wade reminds travelers wishing to stop to pull completely off roads — ideally in a pull-out — and use binoculars for the best views. Travelers should stay at least 25 yards away from most wildlife and at least 100 yards from predators like
3.

The Buffalo Bill Center of the West is five museums under one roof.

bears and wolves.
 
7.      Experience the Cody Nite Rodeo, especially in 2018 when this authentic Western attraction celebrates its 80th season. The longest running summer-season nightly rodeo in the country, Cody Nite Rodeo is a fun and memorable experience for the entire family.
 
8.      Pack smart. Weather in Cody/Yellowstone Country can vary greatly throughout the summer, and travelers should be ready for temperatures that typically range from the 70s to the 40s. Visitors should also plan for a high-altitude experience and bring plenty of sunscreen and refillable water bottles to stay hydrated.
 
9.      Dine around. As travelers might expect, there are plenty of places to find a great steak, but there are also restaurants that specialize in local and sustainable food, ethnic cuisine, sandwiches and diner fare.
 
10.   Live the history. Numerous attractions showcase the history of the region, including Old Trail Town and Museum of the Old West, Buffalo Bill Dam & Visitor Center and the powerful Heart Mountain World War II Interpretive Center – the site of an incarceration camp were 14,000 Japanese-Americans were imprisoned during World War II.

 

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

 

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

 

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


1

What to do in Cody/Yellowstone Country this Winter

 

CODY, Wyo., November 30, 2017 – Although the rodeo cowboys have returned to their ranch jobs and the bears have settled into their dens, Cody/Yellowstone Country is still vibrant during the winter season, with an array of authentic, one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor Western experiences.

“With its location near the border of Yellowstone National Park and a range of adventures and just-plain-fun activities, Cody is a wintertime destination like no other,” said Claudia Wade, Marketing Director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “Winter is a great time for vacationers who enjoy exploring historic Western places and lingering in beautiful natural settings. And it’s also a great place for outdoor fun like skiing and ice climbing.”

Wade said that some of Cody’s frequent visitors plan their trips during the winter when they can spend hours exploring places like the acclaimed Buffalo Bill Center of the West and Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center.

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park and surrounding areas.

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Cross country and downhill skiing and boarding as well as snow shoeing are popular.

Here are 12 things to do in Cody/Yellowstone Country this winter:

1 – Ski Sleeping Giant. Located west of Cody near the east gate of Yellowstone National Park, Sleeping Giant Ski Area has 184 skiable acres with a total of 49 runs, a base elevation of 6,619 feet, vertical drop of 810 feet and an average snowfall of 150 inches. Regular season ski passes are $350 for adults, and one-day adult lift tickets are $36.

2 – Visit a Western treasure, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West (BBCW) was formed to preserve the legacy and vision of Buffalo Bill Cody. It is the oldest and most comprehensive museum of the West, and is comprised of five separate museums: Buffalo Bill Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney Western Art Museum, Cody Firearms Museum and the Draper Natural History Museum. The facility also includes the Harold McCracken Research Library. BBCW is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays during the months of December, January and February. Two-day admission purchased at the door is $19.50.

3 – Climb a waterfall. One of the highest concentrations of waterfall ice climbing in the U.S. is located along the South Fork of the Shoshone

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Winter serves as a stark reminder of the difficulties that faced Japanese Americans at Heart Mountain during WWII.

River just outside of Cody, and climbers from around the world travel to Cody to test their skills. Non-climbers are welcome to watch as the artful athletes make their slow treks up the ice. The 20th-annual Cody Ice Festival is scheduled for Feb. 8-11 and offers clinics for beginners, advanced climbers and women only.

4 – Put yourself in someone else’s shoes. Visit the award-winning Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center, a Japanese internment camp which once housed nearly 14,000 Japanese-American citizens during World War II. This stop is especially poignant in the winter as visitors can truly appreciate the conditions endured by its Japanese-American residents. The Interpretive Center includes an exhibit depicting the typical barracks-style accommodations.

5 – Try some Nordic skiing. There are more than 30 miles of groomed ski trails between Sleeping Giant Ski Area and Pahaska Tepee Resort at Yellowstone’s eastern gate. Enjoy the quiet solitude of the forest and watch for wildlife. Skiers can bring their own lunches or purchase a hot lunch at the Grizzly Grill located in the friendly lodge at Sleeping Giant. Cross country skis can be rented in town.

6 – Ski and stay overnight in the Yellowstone Country wilderness. The Wood River Valley Ski Touring Park operated by the Meeteetse Recreation District and located 22 miles southwest of Meeteetse offers more than 15 miles of groomed trails ranging from the gentle South Fork Trail to the challenging Brown Creek Trail. There is also a cabin on the South Fork Trail available for overnight lodging. There is no fee for skiing, but donations are encouraged to support trail maintenance. There is a minimum cabin donation of $30 per night and a two-night reservation limit.

7 – Watch the skaters. Winter enthusiasts who enjoy watching winter sports may take in a Yellowstone Quake Hockey Team game.  A non-profit, community-based organization, this Tier III Junior A hockey team is comprised of skilled players under the age of 20 who are preparing for advancement to a college program or other professional opportunities. The team plays at the Victor J. Riley Arena, and games are scheduled through mid-February.

8 – Be a skater. Outdoor ice-skating is available at Homesteader Park in Powell, and indoor skating is offered at the Victor J. Riley Arena and Community Events Center in Cody. Both locations provide ice skate rentals. Admission is $5, and skate rentals are $2. Outdoor skating at Homesteader Park is equipped with night lighting and a warming house. Skate rentals and concessions are available on the weekends.

9 – Ride a sled. Winter adventurers who like to feel the rush of cool air on their faces will find a special thrill in Yellowstone Country. There are plenty of places to explore throughout the forestlands outside the park borders on snowmobiles. Gary Fales Outfitting provides winter snowmobile excursions.

10 – Catch – and release – a trout. Yellowstone Country features some of the best blue-ribbon trout stream fishing in North America, and the fish do not know it is winter. Professional fishing guides and outfitters accommodate anglers of any ability.

11 – Shoot replicas of the guns shot by Buffalo Bill Cody. The new Cody Firearms Experience offers travelers a unique history lesson as well as a chance to test shooting skills. Guests shoot replicas of guns like the Indian Trade Musket and Colt Model 1873 Single Action Army Revolver in a state-of-the-art indoor shooting range. Packages start at $35, and special online pricing is available.

12 – Take a hike. Depending on the level of snow and the location, it is possible to enjoy a cold-weather hike with snowshoes or regular hiking boots. Cody Pathways is a system of multi-use trails surrounding the town. Travelers need not go far before they are in prime wildlife viewing territory. The road from Cody to the East Entrance of Yellowstone is full of wildlife-viewing opportunities. It is not unusual to spot moose, bison, elk, eagles and big horn sheep.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]