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Old Trail Town

Cody/Yellowstone Country on a Budget; Free and Moderately Priced Experiences (And a Few Splurge-Worthy Ones Too)

 

CODY, Wyo., January 18, 2018 – Vacationers seeking a high-adventure vacation with a low-budget price tag should plan a trip to northwestern Wyoming’s Cody/Yellowstone Country this summer. Home to an array of authentic Western experiences and offering easy access to Yellowstone National Park, the region offers affordable fun for families, couples, athletes, history buffs, music-lovers and solitude-seekers.

“Fun doesn’t have to cost a fortune in Yellowstone Country,” said Claudia Wade, executive director of the Park County Travel Council, the region’s marketing arm. “With a variety of free and moderately priced adventures, the region offers incredible value for budget-minded travelers.”

With all the money saved, travelers might also want to select a splurge-worthy adventure or two, Wade added.

Cody/Yellowstone Country is home to a wide range of accommodations – from campsites to luxury inns – and travelers who book lodging early have the best choices.

Here are some examples of free and moderately priced experiences (under $30 per person) in Yellowstone Country:

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Locals named this rock formation Henry Ford Rock.

Free activities:

  • Find “Snoopy the Dog” or “Laughing Pig Rock.” The Buffalo Bill Scenic Byway between Cody and the east entrance to Yellowstone National Park has abundant and very weird rock formations and lava flows that have been imaginatively named by locals.
  • Watch the wacky Wild Bunch perform a “gunfight” with a gun safety message. The place to be on summer evenings is outside the Irma Hotel to watch this supremely entertaining group of actors engage in Western skits that always end up in a gunfight. Want a guaranteed seat? Buy a reserved seat for $2 through Cody Trolley Tours, which departs from the same location.
  • See Buffalo Bill Cody’s hunting lodge, Pahaska Tepee. This is where Buffalo Bill went to relax with friends such as Teddy Roosevelt and the Prince of Monaco. Built in 1904, this hunting lodge sits just outside the East Gate of Yellowstone National Park.
  • If there’s someone in the group who likes to see how things work, stop at the Buffalo Bill Dam Visitor Center, located six miles west of Cody. Water was as much a concern in the days of Buffalo Bill Cody as it is in the West today.  Cody foresaw that and convinced the U.S. government to build a dam to help conserve that precious resource.
  • View fine Western art created by local artists at the Cody Country Art League, which shares a historic building – the original Buffalo Bill Museum – with the Cody Visitor Center. Artists with ties to the community display photography, oil and watercolor paintings, sculptures and more.
  • Stroll through history while viewing hundreds of relic guns and other weapons at the Cody Dug Up Gun Museum. This fun and funky museum presents weapons from many periods in American history.
  • Meeteetse Museums is comprised of the Meeteetse Museum, Charles Belden Museum of Western Photography and Bank Museum. The museums house an extensive collection of historic
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    Pahaska TePee was Buffalo Bill Cody’s hunting lodge.

    items and host a variety of free tours such as the Legend Rock Tour, which explores hundreds of ancient petroglyphs.

  • Strap on your walking shoes and hike, stroll and explore downtown Cody and some of the many hiking trails that surround the town. Cody features a variety of shops and artists galleries that welcome window shopping visitors.
  • See a bison, bear, eagle, bighorn sheep, river otter, fox, coyote, elk or wolf in the wild. Spotting wildlife is free, and visitors typically don’t have to go far to see an array of species. Tip: bring binoculars wherever you go and practice safe viewing by leaving plenty of distance from the animal.
  • Enjoy a free concert in Cody’s City Park. Every Thursday evening in July and August the City of Cody sponsors a concert at the band shell in the centrally located park. Picnic baskets, chairs and blankets are encouraged.
  • The recently renovated Historic Cody Mural and Museum depicts scenes of early history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Painted by Edward T. Grigware, the elaborate mural stretches to the visitor center rotunda. The museum includes items brought to Wyoming by Mormon pioneers.
  • The Homesteader Museum in nearby Powell is a collection of exhibits showing the world of pioneers, including renovated homesteader cabins, tools, photographs and other artifacts depicting the rugged life of a Wyoming homesteader.

Moderately priced experiences:

  • Visit Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center, where 14,000 Japanese-American citizens were incarcerated following Japan’s bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. The Interpretive Center
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    There are plentiful hiking trails throughout Cody/Yellowstone Country.

    includes thoughtfully presented exhibits that explore that difficult period of the country’s history, and it is a must-see stop for students of American history, young and old. Admission: $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors.

  • Western history buffs will appreciate a visit to Old Trail Town/Museum of the Old West, an enclave of 26 authentic frontier buildings (one used by Butch Cassidy and his gang) and several gravesites, including that of the infamous Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston – portrayed by actor Robert Redford in the 1972 self-titled film. Admission: adults, $9; children 12 and younger, $5; seniors, $8 and groups of eight or more people, $6 per person.
  • The Cody Nite Rodeo begins its 80th season this year, and it is often travelers’ first rodeo experience. Open nightly from June 1 through August 31, the rodeo features riders, ropers, bull riders and bronc busters from all over the country. Admission: adults and teens, $20; children 7-12, $10; ages 6 and younger, free.
  • Download the Travel Storys app and take a walking tour of Cody. Created in partnership with the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, the audio includes insider tips and true Western tales. Downtown Cody, including Sheridan Ave. – the town’s main street – is highly walkable, with flat streets and many pedestrian-friendly stops.
  • Learn the history and geography of Cody during an hour-long Cody Trolley Tour. Guides entertainingly spin the tales of Cody’s evolution, from wild frontier town to authentic Western vacation destination. Tickets are $27 for adults and $15 for children. Several tours are offered daily throughout the summer season.

Splurge-worthy Adventures

  • Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue, featuring authentic Western music, comedy and poetry, has been an entertainment staple for years. Miller and his Empty Saddles Band team up with the Buffalo Bill Center of the West to offer a dinner and show Monday through Saturday nights. Admission: $42 per person.
  • Take a guided tour of Yellowstone National Park. With 2.2 million acres, five entrances, abundant free-roaming wildlife and geothermal features unlike any other place on Earth, a visit to
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    Cody/Yellowstone Country is rich in wildlife.

    Yellowstone National Park is best explored with guides who share details about the park’s furry residents, hot spots and other natural wonders.

  • Go fishing with a guide. Cody Yellowstone Country is home to hundreds of fishing spots, and the region is known for its blue-ribbon trout fishing.
  • Soar above the Shoshone Forest and the North Fork of the Shoshone River on the Sleeping Giant Zipline. The zipline offers a range of prices including a family adventure package.
  • Rent a Jeep and explore the rugged backroad surrounding Cody Yellowstone Country.
  • Explore Cody/Yellowstone Country the way the early explorers did – on horseback. Numerous stables and dude and guest ranches offer equestrian experiences ranging from authentic week-long adventures to trail rides.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

 

 

President W Harding at Mammoth Hot Springs; Photographer unknown; 1923

President W Harding in Yellowstone.

From White House to Wyoming.

The Presidents Who Came to Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

CODY, Wyo., January 12, 2018 – Nearly every U.S. president since Ulysses S. Grant has visited the state of Wyoming before, during or after their terms in office. Of those presidents, several have ventured to the state’s northwestern region known as Cody/Yellowstone Country, which includes the town of Cody as well as parts of Yellowstone National Park.

“With the approach of President’s Day Weekend, it’s a good time to remember some of the adventures our country’s chief executives have experienced during visits to Cody/Yellowstone Country,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of the region. “Just like the travelers who visit from around the world each year, many of our presidents came simply to get away from day-to-day pressures and experience this authentic Western playground.”

One of those presidents was Chester A. Arthur, who visited Yellowstone Country in 1883 with a large entourage, intent on having an authentic Western experience.  Arthur was known to be bit of a dandy, and in a nod to Western style during a two-month vacation during his term, he covered his business suit with knee-length leather leggings. Arthur kept in touch with the outside world and engaged in presidential business by one daily mail courier on horseback who delivered and received Arthur’s messages.

Here are a few other examples of presidential visits to Cody/Yellowstone Country:

  • President Calvin Coolidge visited Cody on July 4, 1927 for the opening of the Buffalo Bill Museum, the first of five museums that comprise the Buffalo Bill Center of the West today. He also
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    Theodore Roosevelt dedicated the arch at the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park.

    attended the Cody Stampede, a July 4 Cody tradition that will celebrate its 99th season this year. While in the region, Coolidge ventured into Yellowstone National Park and stayed one night in the private home owned by Harry W. Child, owner of then-concessioner Yellowstone Park Company.

  • Theodore Roosevelt was a big fan of the state, and he made several trips during his presidential tenure and returned to Wyoming to vacation after he left Washington. The robust president was far more of a natural in Western-style clothing and activities than some of his predecessors. He was a frequent visitor to Yellowstone Country, and he made his final visit to the park in 1903 during a two-week vacation. During that trip, he laid the cornerstone for the park’s Roosevelt Arch, bearing the inscription: “For the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” Although the arch is in the state of Montana at the northern entrance to Yellowstone, Wyoming celebrates the grand structure too, as most of the park is in Wyoming.
  • Years later, Theodore’s fifth cousin Franklin took office, and he also left his mark on Yellowstone Country. Some would argue it wasn’t a positive mark, as it was Franklin Delano Roosevelt who signed Executive Order 9066 on Feb. 19, 1942. As a result, some 14,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated at the Heart Mountain Confinement Site during World War II. Another interesting tidbit about the publicity-conscious president: When he visited the park, he avoided the park hotels, many with multiple floors and no elevators, and instead was a guest of the lodge manager in his single-floor park home, which could better accommodate his wheelchair while at the same time keeping it from public view.
  • President Bill and first lady Hillary Clinton took a stroll around Old Faithful Geyser in 1995.
  • President Barack Obama and his family visited Yellowstone in 2009 and had lunch in the park’s Old Faithful Snow Lodge.
  • President Jimmy Carter fished in Lake Yellowstone and then returned to the park after his presidency and dined in the employee pub at the park’s Lake Lodge. He even signed the wall of the
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    Franklin Roosevelt signed the order creating Japanese American internment camps during WWII.

    pub, and his signature is still visible today.

  • President George H.W. Bush visited Yellowstone in 1989 to survey the devastation of the 1988 fires. Park officials briefed the president about fire science. Bush also fished in a river near Cody and visited Pahaska Tepee, Buffalo Bill Cody’s hunting lodge.
  • President Warren Harding visited the park in 1923, shortly before he died. Upon learning of his death, staff in the park named a geyser after him and observed a moment of silence in his honor.
  • Although he never visited Yellowstone, the country’s 18th president, Ulysses S. Grant, arguably had the most lasting impact on the region. In 1872, Grant signed the bill that designated Yellowstone as the world’s first national park, a move which is often called “ America’s Best Idea.”

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


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Ten Tips for Planning a Summer Vacation in Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

CODY, Wyo., January 2, 2018 – A Cody/Yellowstone Country vacation can be a trip of a lifetime, one that will be remembered forever by every member of the family. To maximize the experiences, Claudia Wade of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of this northwestern Wyoming region, shares these tips for a fun and memorable vacation in Yellowstone Country.
 
“The best time to plan a summer trip to Cody/Yellowstone Country is in the winter, when there is still plenty of room availability and travelers can choose the best option for their travel style and budget,” said Wade. “And a little time spent on the Cody/Yellowstone Country website will help potential travelers determine the adventures that appeal to them the most, so they begin building a flexible itinerary that will make everyone in the group happy.”
 
1.      Choose where to lay your head and make reservations soon. Cody/Yellowstone is home to an array of dude and guest ranches, Bed and Breakfasts, luxury hotels, boutique inns and cabins. A complete listing of lodging can be found online.
 
2.      Travel before June 20 for the best lodging availability.  Most of the region’s summer-season attractions like the Cody Nite Rodeo and Cody Trolley Tours kick off June 1, but travelers – especially those with school-age kids – don’t typically start hitting the road in droves until after mid-June. “Those of us who have lived here for years can practically guess the date by the number of visitors on Sheridan Avenue,” said Wade. “The visitor floodgates open after the middle of June, so early-June visitors will find plenty of room availability and fewer travelers in museums and on tours.”
 
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Wildlife viewing in the summer includes grizzly bears, elk and more.

3.      Take the Cody Trolley Tour, ideally at the beginning of a visit.  This fun and informative one-hour tour travels around the town and as far as the Buffalo Bill Dam while an on-board narrator introduces riders to the town’s attractions, history and legends.
 
4.      Visit the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Capping the west end of Sheridan Avenue – Cody’s main street – this sprawling facility with five museums under one roof should be on every visitor’s must-do list. Travelers heading to the park will find the Draper Natural History Museum to be a great pre-trip orientation, as exhibits showcase the wildlife and natural history of the Great Yellowstone ecosystem. The other museums are the Buffalo Bill Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney Western Art Museum and Cody Firearms Museum.
 
5.      Tour Yellowstone with an expert. With 2.2 million acres, five entrances, abundant free-roaming wildlife and geothermal features unlike any other place on Earth, a visit to Yellowstone National Park can be a bit overwhelming. Several companies offer daily and multi-day tours with on-board guides who share details about the park’s furry residents, hot spots and other natural wonders.
 
6.      Practice safe viewing. Most Cody/Yellowstone Country visitors will see wildlife such as bison, bighorn sheep and elk along the road. For roadside sightings, Wade reminds travelers wishing to stop to pull completely off roads — ideally in a pull-out — and use binoculars for the best views. Travelers should stay at least 25 yards away from most wildlife and at least 100 yards from predators like
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The Buffalo Bill Center of the West is five museums under one roof.

bears and wolves.
 
7.      Experience the Cody Nite Rodeo, especially in 2018 when this authentic Western attraction celebrates its 80th season. The longest running summer-season nightly rodeo in the country, Cody Nite Rodeo is a fun and memorable experience for the entire family.
 
8.      Pack smart. Weather in Cody/Yellowstone Country can vary greatly throughout the summer, and travelers should be ready for temperatures that typically range from the 70s to the 40s. Visitors should also plan for a high-altitude experience and bring plenty of sunscreen and refillable water bottles to stay hydrated.
 
9.      Dine around. As travelers might expect, there are plenty of places to find a great steak, but there are also restaurants that specialize in local and sustainable food, ethnic cuisine, sandwiches and diner fare.
 
10.   Live the history. Numerous attractions showcase the history of the region, including Old Trail Town and Museum of the Old West, Buffalo Bill Dam & Visitor Center and the powerful Heart Mountain World War II Interpretive Center – the site of an incarceration camp were 14,000 Japanese-Americans were imprisoned during World War II.

 

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

 

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

 

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


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What to do in Cody/Yellowstone Country this Winter

 

CODY, Wyo., November 30, 2017 – Although the rodeo cowboys have returned to their ranch jobs and the bears have settled into their dens, Cody/Yellowstone Country is still vibrant during the winter season, with an array of authentic, one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor Western experiences.

“With its location near the border of Yellowstone National Park and a range of adventures and just-plain-fun activities, Cody is a wintertime destination like no other,” said Claudia Wade, Marketing Director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “Winter is a great time for vacationers who enjoy exploring historic Western places and lingering in beautiful natural settings. And it’s also a great place for outdoor fun like skiing and ice climbing.”

Wade said that some of Cody’s frequent visitors plan their trips during the winter when they can spend hours exploring places like the acclaimed Buffalo Bill Center of the West and Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center.

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park and surrounding areas.

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Cross country and downhill skiing and boarding as well as snow shoeing are popular.

Here are 12 things to do in Cody/Yellowstone Country this winter:

1 – Ski Sleeping Giant. Located west of Cody near the east gate of Yellowstone National Park, Sleeping Giant Ski Area has 184 skiable acres with a total of 49 runs, a base elevation of 6,619 feet, vertical drop of 810 feet and an average snowfall of 150 inches. Regular season ski passes are $350 for adults, and one-day adult lift tickets are $36.

2 – Visit a Western treasure, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West (BBCW) was formed to preserve the legacy and vision of Buffalo Bill Cody. It is the oldest and most comprehensive museum of the West, and is comprised of five separate museums: Buffalo Bill Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney Western Art Museum, Cody Firearms Museum and the Draper Natural History Museum. The facility also includes the Harold McCracken Research Library. BBCW is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays during the months of December, January and February. Two-day admission purchased at the door is $19.50.

3 – Climb a waterfall. One of the highest concentrations of waterfall ice climbing in the U.S. is located along the South Fork of the Shoshone

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Winter serves as a stark reminder of the difficulties that faced Japanese Americans at Heart Mountain during WWII.

River just outside of Cody, and climbers from around the world travel to Cody to test their skills. Non-climbers are welcome to watch as the artful athletes make their slow treks up the ice. The 20th-annual Cody Ice Festival is scheduled for Feb. 8-11 and offers clinics for beginners, advanced climbers and women only.

4 – Put yourself in someone else’s shoes. Visit the award-winning Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center, a Japanese internment camp which once housed nearly 14,000 Japanese-American citizens during World War II. This stop is especially poignant in the winter as visitors can truly appreciate the conditions endured by its Japanese-American residents. The Interpretive Center includes an exhibit depicting the typical barracks-style accommodations.

5 – Try some Nordic skiing. There are more than 30 miles of groomed ski trails between Sleeping Giant Ski Area and Pahaska Tepee Resort at Yellowstone’s eastern gate. Enjoy the quiet solitude of the forest and watch for wildlife. Skiers can bring their own lunches or purchase a hot lunch at the Grizzly Grill located in the friendly lodge at Sleeping Giant. Cross country skis can be rented in town.

6 – Ski and stay overnight in the Yellowstone Country wilderness. The Wood River Valley Ski Touring Park operated by the Meeteetse Recreation District and located 22 miles southwest of Meeteetse offers more than 15 miles of groomed trails ranging from the gentle South Fork Trail to the challenging Brown Creek Trail. There is also a cabin on the South Fork Trail available for overnight lodging. There is no fee for skiing, but donations are encouraged to support trail maintenance. There is a minimum cabin donation of $30 per night and a two-night reservation limit.

7 – Watch the skaters. Winter enthusiasts who enjoy watching winter sports may take in a Yellowstone Quake Hockey Team game.  A non-profit, community-based organization, this Tier III Junior A hockey team is comprised of skilled players under the age of 20 who are preparing for advancement to a college program or other professional opportunities. The team plays at the Victor J. Riley Arena, and games are scheduled through mid-February.

8 – Be a skater. Outdoor ice-skating is available at Homesteader Park in Powell, and indoor skating is offered at the Victor J. Riley Arena and Community Events Center in Cody. Both locations provide ice skate rentals. Admission is $5, and skate rentals are $2. Outdoor skating at Homesteader Park is equipped with night lighting and a warming house. Skate rentals and concessions are available on the weekends.

9 – Ride a sled. Winter adventurers who like to feel the rush of cool air on their faces will find a special thrill in Yellowstone Country. There are plenty of places to explore throughout the forestlands outside the park borders on snowmobiles. Gary Fales Outfitting provides winter snowmobile excursions.

10 – Catch – and release – a trout. Yellowstone Country features some of the best blue-ribbon trout stream fishing in North America, and the fish do not know it is winter. Professional fishing guides and outfitters accommodate anglers of any ability.

11 – Shoot replicas of the guns shot by Buffalo Bill Cody. The new Cody Firearms Experience offers travelers a unique history lesson as well as a chance to test shooting skills. Guests shoot replicas of guns like the Indian Trade Musket and Colt Model 1873 Single Action Army Revolver in a state-of-the-art indoor shooting range. Packages start at $35, and special online pricing is available.

12 – Take a hike. Depending on the level of snow and the location, it is possible to enjoy a cold-weather hike with snowshoes or regular hiking boots. Cody Pathways is a system of multi-use trails surrounding the town. Travelers need not go far before they are in prime wildlife viewing territory. The road from Cody to the East Entrance of Yellowstone is full of wildlife-viewing opportunities. It is not unusual to spot moose, bison, elk, eagles and big horn sheep.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

 

 

 

Registration Opens for 20th-Annual Cody Ice Festival

 

CODY, Wyo., Nov. 15, 2017 – Registration has opened for the 20th-annual Cody Ice Festival scheduled for Feb. 8-11, 2018 in Cody/Yellowsto1ne Country. With a line-up of affordable clinics for beginners, experienced climbers and women only, the festival promises the biggest ice of any festival in North America.

The popular festival promotes safety, stewardship, education and camaraderie and includes ice climbing clinics by day and nightly speakers and presentations developed to inspire and encourage festival participants. In the evenings, there are nightly raffles for ice climbing gear and bottomless beer pours with the purchase of a pint glass.

“Whether you are an experienced ice climber or new to the sport, the Cody Ice Fest will help you take your climbing to the next level, and you’ll have fun in the process,” said Ari Novak, director of the Cody Ice Festival for the second year. “With climbing routes that are five and six pitches long, this is some of the biggest ice some climbers ever get to climb, and our instructors will help ensure that the experience is fun and memorable.”

 

Established in 1998, the festival offers world-class instruction through on-ice clinics in one of the most exciting ice climbing venues in the world. Nightly speakers include some of the most accomplished and inspiriting alpinists and ice climbers in the world.

Clinics

Each clinic is led by a top professional mountain guide and a professional athlete. Clinics range in price from $150 to $200, and there is also a free ice climbing day on Sunday priced at $25. Active members of the military and veterans receive a 10 percent discount off the price of the clinics.

The festival will include clinics for advanced climbers and beginners as well as all-female clinics taught by female athletes.

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The festival promotes safety, stewardship and more.

World-Class Ice Climbing Region

Ice routes can be found in the North and South Forks of the Shoshone, the region to the west of the town of Cody, Wyo. The South Fork of the Shoshone is home to the highest concentration of frozen waterfalls in the United States, with more than 200 climbable pitches within a 10-mile radius. Creatively named routes include “Broken Hearts,” a classic route that can be as long as seven pitches of ice climbing. Another route, “Mean Green,” offers 300 meters (approximately 3/16 of a mile) of climbable ice. “Miami Ice,” is a route made famous by world-renowned alpinist Alex Lowe, who lost his life climbing in Tibet. The single-pitch route is one of the most popular climbs in the region. Cody is home to plenty of long moderate and advanced ice routes offering a memorable experience for climbers of all abilities.

Commercially guided ice climbing made its debut in 2011 in Shoshone National Forest outside of Cody, Wyo. as the National Forest Service issued the first permits to outfitters to lead ice-climbing trips.

The region is comprised of porous volcanic soil that allows for easy water seepage. The mountains receive large amounts of snow that melts into a high number of drainages. These factors result in spring-fed waterfalls that are constantly regenerating themselves and freezing into high-quality ice climbs. Climbers are still discovering new waterfalls in the region, and some have made dozens of “first ascents” over the past few years.

More About the Festival

The Cody Ice Festival will offer participants discounted rates at Cody-area hotels and transportation to the climbs.

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

 

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The Civilian Conservation Corps was established in 1933.

What’s New and Notable in Cody/Yellowstone Country in 2018

 

CODY, Wyo., Oct. 12, 2017 – From the 100th anniversary of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West to the 50th anniversary of Old Trail Town and Museum of the West, it’s been an eventful year for Cody/Yellowstone Country. And the pattern of notable anniversaries and milestones will continue into 2018 as this northwestern Wyoming region continues to draw increasing numbers of visitors from around the world.

“Cody/Yellowstone was built on the big dreams of legendary leaders who helped create a destination that inspires, educates and fascinates more than one million visitors annually,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of the destination. “By tracking milestones and anniversaries of the region, we can better appreciate the quirks, legends and traditions that have made Yellowstone Country a world-renowned destination.”

What’s New and Notable in 2018:

  • 135th anniversary of the first Wild West Show. Buffalo Bill staged the first Wild West Show in Omaha, Neb. on May 19, 1883. With a proven knack for production and promotion, Cody persuaded top talents such as Annie Oakley to perform, and the show prospered. During 1899, for example, Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show was performed 341 times in 132 cities in 200 days. With tours throughout the U.S. and Europe, Buffalo Bill Cody became the most famous man in the world. A declining interest before World War I – due to popularity of motion pictures and sports as well as a general worldwide unease – eventually led to the show’s bankruptcy in 1913.
  • 30th anniversary of fires that impacted one-third of Yellowstone National Park along with large swaths of forest surrounding park borders. The fires – which burned perilously close to
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    The Yellowstone fires in 1988 burned close to one third of the park.

    some park structures – were fought by more than 25,000 people, and more than $120 million was spent on the efforts. Rain and snow finally stopped the advance of fires. The Greater Yellowstone fires of 1988 led to permanent changes in firefighting management, and it increased significantly the public’s understanding of fire ecology.

  • 10th anniversary of the delisting of the gray wolf in Wyoming. The story of the wolves in the West is a long one, and each new historic milestone can be traced to ever-evolving political priorities. In a nutshell: wolves were eliminated from Yellowstone Country in the early days of the park.  In 1974, the gray wolf was listed as endangered. In 1995 and 1996, 31 gray wolves from Canada were relocated to Yellowstone, beginning the repopulation of the species in the region. In 2008, wolves were removed from the endangered species list. The following year they were returned to the federal endangered species list due to a legal challenge. In 2012, wolves were again delisted. And in 2014, they were relisted. Currently, Wyoming wolves remain on the
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    The Cody Nite Rodeo will be celebrating 80 years.

    federal endangered species list.

  • 80th anniversary of the Cody Nite Rodeo. Known as the Rodeo Capital of the World, Cody visitors have been treated to the nightly summer-season spectacle of world-class rodeo since 1938. The first rodeo many visitors have ever experienced, Cody Nite Rodeo is where top rodeo performers demonstrate their skills in horsemanship and roping events like tie-down roping, barrel racing and steer-wrestling. Many events were inspired by the real-life skills Western ranching families needed to thrive on the rugged Wyoming frontier.
  • 20th anniversary of the Cody Ice Festival. Scheduled for Feb. 7 – 11, 2018, the popular festival promises the biggest ice of any ice-climbing festival in North America, with clinics for beginners and experts alike.
  • 25th anniversary of the Buffalo Bill Dam Visitor Center. The Buffalo Bill Dam was the world’s tallest concrete dam when it was completed in 1910, and the visitor center, built in 1993, celebrates this architectural and historic marvel.
  • 100th anniversary of National Park Service management of Yellowstone. The freshly minted National Park Service – a product of the Organic Act signed by President Woodrow Wilson

    – took over park operations from the U.S. Army in 1918.

  • 85th anniversary of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Established in 1933 during the Great Depression with the dual goals of helping unemployed young men and improving and
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    The Cody Ice Festival features some of the country’s best climbing.

    protecting public lands, CCC enrollees had to be between 18 and 25 years old, unmarried, unemployed and with a family in need back home. In Wyoming, men improved infrastructure, built lodges and museums, protected wildlife and fought forest fires, including a deadly fire west of Cody in 1937 that killed nine men. CCC is credited with reviving and beautifying Yellowstone Country and ultimately reversing a decline in visitors to the region.

  • 80th anniversary of the Mammoth Post Office. Established in 1938, the park’s elaborate main post office was built in the French Renaissance Modern style using stone from a nearby quarry. Still in operation today, the building was one of more than one thousand post offices built in the 1930s, many of them similarly and intentionally ornamental.
  • 135th anniversary of the opening of the National Hotel in Yellowstone National Park. Situated near the northern entrance to the park, the National Hotel opened for business in August 1883, and it quickly became the popular first stop for visitors arriving via the Northern Pacific Railroad. All but one wing of the hotel was demolished in 1936 and replaced by a lodge with a large lobby and portico and a separate building for a restaurant. That original wing is part of Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel today.
  • 135th anniversary of the construction of the Hole in the Wall Cabin. The hideout of outlaw Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch, the two-room Hole in the Wall cabin is one of 26 frontier buildings on display at Cody’s Old Trail Town and Museum of the West.
  • 140th anniversary of River’s Saloon. Also on display at Old Trail Town the River’s Saloon was originally situated near present-day Meeteetse, Wyo. and it was a popular haunt among gold miners, cowboys and outlaws alike. Bullet holes that can still be seen in the door are a testament to the rough times on the Wyoming frontier. It is the oldest remaining saloon in northwest Wyoming.
  • 70th anniversary of reaching one million Yellowstone visitors in a calendar year. One million visitors traveled to the park in 1948. The park surpassed 4 million visitors in 2016.

Recapping 2017

This year’s milestones included the 100th anniversary of the death of Buffalo Bill Cody; 100th anniversary of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West; 15th anniversary of the Draper Natural History Museum at the Center of the West; 50th anniversary of Old Trail Town and Museum of the Old West; and the 75th anniversary of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066, which resulted in the incarceration of 14,000 Japanese-Americans at the Heart Mountain Confinement Site near Cody.

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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

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The Buffalo Bill Dam provides irrigation in the region.

10 Ways to Celebrate History in Cody/Yellowstone Country

CODY, Wyo., Oct. 5, 2017 – The small town of Cody, Wyoming is a big destination for students of history, with an array of attractions that celebrate the larger-than-life personality and accomplishments of town founder Buffalo Bill as well as the colorful and sometimes sobering heritage of this classic Western town.

“Buffalo Bill Cody didn’t become the most famous man in the world by blending in, and his antics and accomplishments on display in museums and other attractions continue to provide Cody visitors with an accurate and entertaining look at the events that led to the development of our friendly little town,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council. “It’s not always about Buffalo Bill, though. By exploring the places where big things – good and bad — happened, you take home new lessons and insights that remain relevant in today’s world.”

Wade recommends these 10 history-revealing stops in Cody/Yellowstone Country:

The Irma Hotel

Built by William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody and named after his daughter, the Irma Hotel still hosts overnight guests and feeds hungry travelers. The hotel is an authentic Cody landmark that captures the essence of Western hospitality and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Enjoy the prime rib, check out the fireplace Cody and his friends designed, have a drink at the Cherrywood bar England’s Queen Victoria gifted to her friend Buffalo Bill and tour the old hotel that doubled as Cody’s headquarters.

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The Buffalo Bill Center of the West is five museums under one roof.

The Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Tour the five museums that comprise the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Founded in 1917 to preserve the legacy and vision of Buffalo Bill Cody, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West is the oldest and most comprehensive museum of the American West. Its five museums are the Buffalo Bill Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney Western Art Museum, Cody Firearms Museum and the Draper Natural History Museum. The facility also includes the Harold McCracken Research Library.

 

 

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Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center is located outside of town.

Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center

Visit the award-winning Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center. Located northeast of Cody, this Japanese-American internment camp housed 14,000 citizens during World War II. Exhibits paint a picture of citizens taken from their homes, uprooted and relocated to an unfamiliar place. A stop in winter is especially poignant as visitors can truly appreciate the bleak conditions endured by incarcerees.

 

Hemingway’s Local Hotel

The Chamberlin Inn hosted “Ernest Hemingway of Key West, Florida” in 1932 after he completed the manuscript for Death in the Afternoon, and the hotel has the original guest register with his signature to prove it. The author enjoyed fishing the Clarks Fork River by day and swapping stories with the locals in the Irma Bar at night. The room in which Hemingway stayed is available to overnight guests.

Pahaska Tepee

When he wasn’t entertaining the world in his Wild West Show, Buffalo Bill entertained his hunting pals – including Theodore Roosevelt and the Prince of Monaco – at his rustic lodge. Called Pahaska Teepee and located just outside the east entrance to Yellowstone National Park, the log lodge displays many gifts given to Cody by guests. Modern cabins, a restaurant and gift shop make this a great stop for travelers.

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The Cody Dug Up Gun Museum features several examples of old firearms found in unusual places.

Cody Dug Up Gun Museum

The fun and family-friendly Cody Dug Up Gun Museum houses a collection of relic guns and weapons throughout American history. This hidden gem is a must-see for travelers interested in the stories about how specific guns were unearthed.

Old Trail Town and Museum of the West

Cabins and gravesites at Old Trail Town and Museum of the Old West in this enclave of 26 authentic frontier buildings includes one used by Butch Cassidy and his infamous Hole-in-the-Wall Gang. One of the town’s many gravesites belongs to Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston – portrayed by actor Robert Redford in the 1972 film.

 

The Meeteetse Bank Museum

Speaking of Butch Cassidy, he once lived in Meeteetse, and despite his reputation as a prolific and highly successful bank robber, he pledged not to rob the Meeteetse Bank so he and his friends would have a safe place to stash their ill-gotten cash. That bank is now the Meeteetse Bank Museum, and it still displays the original teller’s cage, vault and many other artifacts.

The Buffalo Bill Dam & Visitor Center

The Buffalo Bill Dam was once the tallest concrete dam in the world and a National Civil Engineering Landmark and was operational before Buffalo Bill Cody’s death in 1917. The visitor center’s exhibits show how the dam fulfilled the forward-thinking showman’s goal to bring a reliable water source to the Bighorn Basin.

Historic Cody Mural and Museum

The murals on display at the Cody Mural and Museum located in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints depict the history of Mormon pioneers who immigrated from Utah and Idaho to Wyoming’s Big Horn Basin. There is also the massive Cody Mural on a domed ceiling telling the history of the first 70 years of the church.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse, Wyoming as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. The one-time playground of Buffalo Bill Cody, Cody/Yellowstone Country is known for its world-class cultural attractions and recreational adventures. The region hosts nearly 1 million visitors annually.

The destination is home to an array of year-round attractions, and it offers easy access to the East and Northeast gates of Yellowstone National Park. Most visitors to Cody also visit Yellowstone.

Find out more at www.codyyellowstone.org or by connecting on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

 

 

 

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These Things Might Have Knocked Buffalo Bill Cody Off His Steed…Figuratively, of Course

CODY, Wyo., Aug. 25, 2017 – This year is the 100th anniversary of the death of Buffalo Bill Cody, a man who spent his life surprising those around him. He surprised a railroad with his hunting prowess, a queen with his charm, women and American Indians with his new-fashioned sense of fairness and tolerance and an entire town with his visionary restlessness. He was the quintessential self-reliant frontiersman, a pragmatist who was not easily surprised.
A lot can happen in a century, though, and some occurrences in his namesake town of Cody, Wyoming during the last century might just knock Buffalo Bill off his horse, figuratively speaking.
Here are some of them:
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The Buffalo Bill Center of the West is a world-class facility.

The museum that bears his name is a world-class destination.
Just weeks after his death, Cody’s friends formed the Buffalo Bill Memorial Association, which has morphed into the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, a complex of five museums. Recently named the top Western Museum in the country by True West Magazine, museums include Buffalo Bill Museum, Draper Natural History Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney Western Art Museum and Cody Firearms Museum. Visitors come from throughout the world to wander the expansive galleries and rotating exhibits and witness cultural and historic events like the annual Plains Indian Powwow and Rendezvous Royale, a celebration of Western art.

 

 

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The American Bison has made a comeback.

The American Bison was rescued from extinction.
Buffalo Bill and other 1800s hunters dramatically depleted the free-roaming herds of bison. In one 18-month period in the late 1860s, Cody killed more than 4,000 bison to feed railroad workers. By 1901, there were only 25 bison in nearby Yellowstone National Park. Cody might be surprised that painstaking conservation efforts in Yellowstone and elsewhere were able to repopulate the species. Today, there are 4,000 bison in Yellowstone Country.
Wolves went and came.
Once abundant, the numbers of gray wolves had been steadily decimated by ranchers, hunters and Yellowstone National Park managers, and nine years after Buffalo Bill’s death, they were completely gone. Due to the relentless dedication of biologists, conservationist and others, however, wolves were returned to the park in 1995.
The newspaper he founded is still tops.
Buffalo Bill Cody and his associate John Peake established the Cody Enterprise in 1899, and the continuously operated semi-weekly newspaper has won many awards for journalistic excellence throughout itsThe American Bison has made a comeback. history.
We’re still talking about his grave.
Buffalo Bill wanted to be buried on Cody’s Spirit Mountain, but sad circumstances led to a Denver funeral and burial in a suburban monument that was recently named Colorado’s worst tourist trap. But many Cody residents to this day claim that his body is buried in an unmarked grave atop the Cody mountain. Here’s the story: His beleaguered widow made a deal with publicity-hungry politicians and the publisher of The Denver Post, who offered cash to keep his body in Colorado. Outraged, heartbroken friends traveled covertly to Denver to switch Buffalo Bill’s corpse with that of a lookalike ranch hand and quietly buried his body on top of the mountain that overlooks the town he built. Or so the story goes.
2Cody is the “Rodeo Capital of the World.”He started it, and rodeo is still a thing.
Buffalo Bill’s very first Wild West Show, which he first staged in North Platte, Neb. in 1882, helped inspire professional rodeo as it is today. When the Wild West Show went on tour, the combination of skill and showmanship prompted audiences to romanticize and novelists to popularize life in the “Wild West.” Today, equestrians, cowboys and clowns perform their tricks and showcase their talents at the Cody Nite Rodeo, the longest running summer-season nightly rodeo in the U.S. This was the 98th year of the Cody Stampede, multiple days of rodeos during the July 4 holiday.
A dark spot in Cody’s history has prompted ongoing discussions of racial tolerance.
Buffalo Bill was ahead of his time in many ways, including his tolerant and fair treatment of American Indians and women. It might surprise him, then, that the U.S. government chose a bleak, windswept mountain just outside of Cody to imprison 14,000 Japanese-American citizens during World War II. The award-winning Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center reminds visitors of the heartbreaking challenges faced by incarcerees while urging them to ask themselves the question, “could this happen again?”
Cody has grown, but not that much.
There are now nearly 10,000 full-time residents of Cody. That’s downright urban compared to the town’s population of about 1,200 around the time of his death, but it is still a small town by most standards.
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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.
The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.
Related hashtags:#YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming
Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
(970) 286-2751
[email protected]
[email protected]

 

 

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There are many miles of hiking trails throughout the region.

 

Fall Fun in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country

CODY, Wyo., Aug. 17, 2017 – Fall in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country heralds far more than colorful trees. During the months of September and October, visitors see fine Western art and meet the artists who created it. They hear the bugling elk and cowboy music. They taste locally made brews and meals created from regional ingredients. And they experience northwest Wyoming’s abundant outdoor adventures and cultural heritage.

“Fall is a season that is especially appreciated by mature audiences,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the tourism marketing arm for Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country. “With kids back in school, Yellowstone Country becomes an adult playground that fills the senses with authentic Western pleasures.”

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

Here’s what visitors to Yellowstone Country can expect in the fall:

Western art. The most prestigious event of the year in Cody is Rendezvous Royale, a week-long celebration of authentic Western art Sept. 16-23. Highlights of the week include a workshop about building a Thomas Molesworth-influenced coffee table, a 2½-day painting workshop, live art auction, quick draw event and a glamorous ball on the final night.

Wildlife. The forests, river valleys, mountains and canyons of Yellowstone Country are home to bears, elk, wolves, moose, bighorn sheep, bison, pronghorn, deer, eagles, river otters and many other mammals, birds and other species.

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Fall wildlife viewing includes the elk rut.

Blue-ribbon trout fishing. Yellowstone Country is home to several top fishing spots including the North and South Forks of the Shoshone River. Cody is home to several fishing outfitters that can offer guides, maps and advice.

Fall bounty. Local and sustainable food offerings have continued to expand in Cody, resulting in several restaurants and stores that incorporate the bounty of northwestern Wyoming ranchers and farmers into their offerings. Not surprisingly, beef and bison are readily available, but many locations also offer freshly harvested produce and locally made beer and wine.

Hiking. Yellowstone’s bounty also extends to its hiking trails, which are numerous throughout the region. Local favorites include the Bluebird Trail on Bureau of Land Management land five miles from town. Cedar Mountain Trail, begins with a strenuous uphill climb, and hikers are rewarded with spectacular views from the summit. The Prickly Pear Trail is a paved walking trail that circles two lakes.

Rock climbing. The region is well-suited to climbing, with porous rock creating drainages and rock formations that appeal to climbers of all abilities. Conditions are typically good for rock climbing through October. Local outfitters lead classes and rock-climbing expeditions throughout the region.

Driving. Yellowstone Country road-tripping in the fall is a memorable way to enjoy fall color, with five scenic drives leading into Cody that take travelers past some of Wyoming’s most breathtaking valleys, mountain passes, rivers and forests.

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Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue continues through Oct. 7.

History. The Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center at the site of the Heart Mountain Internment Camp offers a glimpse of the lives of some 14,000 Japanese-American citizens who were interned there during World War II. Opened in August 2011, the center explores that difficult period of the country’s history with thoughtful exhibits that encourage visitors to ask the question “Could this happen today?”. The storied life of the town’s founder, Colonel William Frederick Cody, is presented in the recently reinstalled Buffalo Bill Museum, one of five museums that comprise the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. There are also museums dedicated to firearms, fine Western Art, the Plains Indians of the region and the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem.

Music. Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue continues its performances of cowboy music, poetry and comedy Monday through Saturday night through Oct. 7. The Cody Cattle Company provides a casual evening at picnic tables with music and a chuckwagon dinner through Sept. 23.

Tours The Cody Trolley Tours’ “Best of the West” tour provides a terrific introduction to the destination. This informative one-hour tour covers 22 miles and helps orient visitors to where things are and what they might like to go back to see.

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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

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How and Where to View the Solar Eclipse in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country

CODY, Wyo., Aug. 7, 2017 – The biggest celestial event of the century is occurring in a few weeks, and residents and visitors in Wyoming will have front row seats.  
 
Although Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country is slightly north of the total solar eclipse path that is cutting through the width of the state on August 21, viewing is still expected to be excellent. Cody is expecting a 98 percent obscuration rate, meaning that only a sliver of sun will be viewable as the moon passes in front.
 
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Beck Lake Park near the airport features asphalt trails around two reservoirs.

 “The unobstructed skies of Yellowstone Country are perfect for viewing the eclipse, and all eyes will be on the sky that morning,” said Claudia Wade director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “We recommend that locals and visitors alike grab their protective eclipse eyewear – which they can purchase for a nominal fee from the Cody Chamber of Commerce – and settle in for a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”
 

Protective eyewear essential

Experts urge everyone who intends to experience the eclipse, regardless of location, to purchase protective solar eclipse eyewear. In Yellowstone Country, visitors and locals can purchase disposable glasses for $5. These glasses are an essential precaution to prevent the sun’s powerful rays from burning the retinas and potentially causing damage and even blindness.
 

Where to watch

Skygazers in Yellowstone Country have many options, from one of Cody’s city parks to remote Bureau of Land Management trails. Here are some suggestions.
 
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City Park is convenient for people already in town.

·        Beck Lake Park is a city park near the Yellowstone Regional Airport with two miles of asphalt trails encircling two large reservoirs. Points along the trail offer spectacular views of the town and beyond.  
 
·        Situated on the shore of the Buffalo Bill Reservoir, Buffalo Bill State Park is a good choice for boaters, campers, paddlers and anglers who want to combine a day of viewing with other outdoor fun. The brainchild of town founder Buffalo Bill Cody, the massive reservoir provides irrigation to the farms and ranches throughout the region.
 
·        Cody’s City Park is centrally located within steps of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, and it is a good choice for travelers who plan to tour the town after the eclipse. The park features an outdoor stage that is often used for Cody’s many events and festivals as well as manicured grass for visitors to bring along a picnic.
 
·        The charming nearby town of Meeteetse is another possibility. The town may be the most fitting place for friends to meet for a viewing party because the name of the town is derived from an Indian phrase that means “meeting place.” The town’s old-fashioned wooden boardwalk lining both sides of main street will provide a fitting authentic Western backdrop such an unusual Wyoming experience.
 
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The solar eclipse will pass over Wyoming with Cody close to the complete blockage of the sun.

·        Four Bear Trail is a Bureau of Land Management area to the west of the Buffalo Bill Reservoir. The trail – open to hikers and equestrians – summits at about 7,600 feet and offers spectacular views of the North Fork Shoshone River Valley and the volcanic spires and red rock formations of the region. Wildlife like golden eagles and bighorn sheep can often be viewed from the trail.
 
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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.
The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.
 
Related hashtags:  #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming  
Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
(970) 286-2751
[email protected]
[email protected]