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Find the latest, greatest breaking news on all things Cody/Yellowstone Country, right here. Check back often so you never miss a beat of the Wild West. Find out what’s new with attractions, events and the towns that make up Park County.

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Two Scenic byways are located between Cody and Yellowstone National Park.

Cody  Yellowstone  Offers  Tips  to  Make  a  Vacation  the  Best  “Time”  Possible

CODY, Wyo., Feb. 13, 2019 – For many people, winter is the time to plan their vacations. Making the most of their time off is best achieved with some advance planning, and that’s especially true for visitors to Cody Yellowstone in Northwest Wyoming.

“We have been hosting guests in and around the world’s first national park for more than a century, and we have seen enough to know what works,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of the region.

Wade offers these time-management tips for planning a Cody Yellowstone vacation in 2019:

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The Cody Nite Rodeo has introduced multiple generations to the sport.

Take the time off in the first place. Workers in the United States leave way too much vacation time on the table, according to the U.S. Travel Association. While people may think they are indispensable or that their employers will think they are slackers if they are not at work all the time, studies show that time off helps people be more productive and is good for their health and minds.

Take into account distances. “The atlas that devotes a page to each state can be pretty misleading,” said Wade. “The drive across Illinois on Interstate 80 is significantly shorter than Wyoming’s.”

Plan the most interesting route. With two designated Scenic Byways (Buffalo Bill and Chief Joseph) between Cody and Yellowstone National Park, travelers can enjoy forests, valleys, mountain passes and historical stops that confirm that the journey is a major part of the vacation.

Budget enough time for town. It’s not uncommon for return visitors to build in extra time because they simply did not realize the first time there was so much to see and do, said Wade. History buffs might come for the Buffalo Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West and not realize that they should also check out the Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center and the Old Trail Town & Museum of the Old West. Those who are adventure-oriented may want to enjoy hiking, mountain biking, whitewater rafting and some of the world’s best trout fishing.

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The areas in and and around Yellowstone feature some of the world’s best wildlife watching.

Budget enough time for the park. At close to 2.2 million acres, Yellowstone is bigger than the states of Delaware and Rhode Island combined. Many people drive through the park in a single day with a stop to watch Old Faithful erupt. Wade recommends that guests stay overnight in the park or make multiple day trips. Either way, there are too many hikes to take, visitor centers to visit, wildlife to watch and thermal features to learn about in a single day.

Choose your timing. Travelers who wish to experience Cody’s acclaimed Cody Nite Rodeo should schedule their vacations between June 1 and August 31. Many attractions are open year-round. Park roads are all open to wheeled vehicles in summer while most of the park is open only to over-the-snow vehicles in winter. During early spring and late fall it’s best to check on road closures.

Figure out transportation. For road-trippers, getting there is part of the fun. The American West is home to historical sites and markers, expansive landscapes and an array of wildlife, which can often be viewed from pull-outs or alongside roads. Vacationers who prefer to fly will find daily flights to the Yellowstone Regional Airport, located five minutes from town.

Leave some time to relax. Many people think that they need to fill up every waking moment, but that approach results in stress, fatigue and various activities all running together. Wade recommends slowing down to eat an ice cream cone, watch bald eagles and listen to local music such as Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue.

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Home of the Great American Adventure, Cody Yellowstone is comprised of the northwestern Wyoming towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. The region is known for rodeos, authentic guest and dude ranches, world-class museums and recreational adventures that reflect the adventurous spirit of the visionaries and explorers who brought the remote region to the world’s attention.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #ThatsWY

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

720-284-1512

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

 

Presidents  Day  is  a  Reminder  of  Which  Presidents  Visited  Cody  Yellowstone

 

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President Harding in Yellowstone National Park.

CODY, Wyo., February 5, 2019 – U.S. presidents are like the rest of us in the sense that every now and then they want to get out of the big city and head to some place like, well,Cody Yellowstone.

“Since the late 1800s our presidents have made a point to participate in their version of the Great American Adventure with a true Western experience,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of the region. “It’s natural to look fondly on those visits as we approach President’s Day Weekend.”

One of those presidents was Chester A. Arthur, who visited Yellowstone Country in 1883 with a large entourage, intent on having an authentic Western experience.  Arthur was known to be bit of a dandy, and in a nod to Western style during a two-month vacation during his term, he covered his business suit with knee-length leather leggings. Arthur kept in touch with the outside world and engaged in presidential business by one daily mail courier on horseback who delivered and received Arthur’s messages.

Here are a few other examples of presidential visits to Cody/Yellowstone Country:

President Calvin Coolidge visited Cody on July 4, 1927 for the opening of the Buffalo Bill Museum, the first of five museums that comprise the Buffalo Bill Center of the West today. He also attended the Cody Stampede, a July 4 Cody tradition that will celebrate its 99th season this year. While in the region, Coolidge ventured into Yellowstone National Park and stayed one night in the private home owned by Harry W. Child, owner of then-concessioner Yellowstone Park Company.

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The Roosevelt Arch was named in honor of Theodore Roosevelt.

Theodore Roosevelt was a big fan of the state, and he made several trips during his presidential tenure and returned to Wyoming to vacation after he left Washington. The robust president was far more of a natural in Western-style clothing and activities than some of his predecessors. He was a frequent visitor to Yellowstone Country, and he made his final visit to the park in 1903 during a two-week vacation. During that trip, he laid the cornerstone for the park’s Roosevelt Arch, bearing the inscription: “For the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” Although the arch is in the state of Montana at the northern entrance to Yellowstone, Wyoming celebrates the grand structure too, as most of the park is in Wyoming.

Years later, Theodore’s fifth cousin Franklin took office, and he also left his mark on Yellowstone Country. Some would argue it wasn’t a positive mark, as it was Franklin Delano Roosevelt who signed Executive Order 9066 on Feb. 19, 1942. As a result, some 14,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated at the Heart Mountain Confinement Site during World War II. Another interesting tidbit about the publicity-conscious president: When he visited the park, he avoided the park hotels, many with multiple floors and no elevators, and instead was a guest of the lodge manager in his single-floor park home, which could better accommodate his wheelchair while at the same time keeping it from public view.

President Bill and first lady Hillary Clinton took a stroll around Old Faithful Geyser in 1995.

President Barack Obama and his family visited Yellowstone in 2009 and had lunch in the park’s Old Faithful Snow Lodge.

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The Obama family visited Old Faithful in 2009.

President Jimmy Carter fished in Lake Yellowstone and then returned to the park after his presidency and dined in the employee pub at the park’s Lake Lodge. He even signed the wall of the pub, and his signature is still visible today.

President George H.W. Bush visited Yellowstone in 1989 to survey the devastation of the 1988 fires. Park officials briefed the president about fire science. Bush also fished in a river near Cody and visited Pahaska Tepee, Buffalo Bill Cody’s hunting lodge.

President Warren Harding visited the park in 1923, shortly before he died. Upon learning of his death, staff in the park named a geyser after him and observed a moment of silence in his honor.

Although he never visited Yellowstone, the country’s 18th president, Ulysses S. Grant, arguably had the most lasting impact on the region. In 1872, Grant signed the bill that designated Yellowstone as the world’s first national park, a move which is often called “America’s Best Idea.”

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Home of the Great American Adventure, Cody Yellowstone is comprised of the northwestern Wyoming towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. The region is known for rodeos, authentic guest and dude ranches, world-class museums and recreational adventures that reflect the adventurous spirit of the visionaries and explorers who brought the remote region to the world’s attention.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry  #CodyWyoming  #CenteroftheWest  #BuffaloBill  #Yellowstone  #ThatsWY

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

720-284-1512

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

Centennial   of   Cody   Stampede   Among   Notable   Anniversaries   in   Cody   Yellowstone   in   2019

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The Cody Stampede will celebrate its 100th anniversary next year.

CODY, Wyo., November 13, 2018 – When the sentimental but pragmatic leaders of Cody, Wyoming circa 1919 created the Cody Stampede, they had two goals in mind: to honor the town’s legendary founder and the Western traditions he represented, and to capture the interest and a few dollars from tourists who passed through town on the new “Road to Yellowstone.”

Though they were visionaries, they could never have imagined that the four-day annual event would become one of the “top small-town American Fourth of July celebrations in the West.”

Scheduled for Sunday, July 1 through Wednesday, July 4, the Cody Stampede marks its 100th anniversary in 2019. The celebration includes nightly Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association (PRCA)-sanctioned rodeos, parades, free concerts, craft fairs, fireworks and much more. And there are sure to be a few surprises this year too.

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The Scout was unveiled 95 years ago.

“Enthusiasm for the centennial of the Cody Stampede is high in our little town, and rodeo cowboys, float designers and band directors are already planning how to make their marks on the occasion,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region that includes the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the east valley of Yellowstone National Park.

The centennial of the Cody Stampede is just one of several noteworthy anniversaries of events and attractions in 2019. Here are some more.

What’s new and notable at museums and attractions in Cody Yellowstone in 2019:

95th anniversary of The Scout. Heiress and hyper-talented sculptress Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney created this massive bronze sculpture depicting Buffalo Bill Cody on horseback. The sculpture was installed in 1924 and ultimately became the cornerstone of the Whitney Western Art Museum.

60th anniversary of the Whitney Western Art Museum. One of five museums within the world-renowned Buffalo Bill Center of the West, the Whitney Western Art Museum was created in 1959 with initial funding provided by Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney, the son of artist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. Considered one of the top Western art galleries in the country, the museum includes original paintings, sculptures and prints by top artists including Albert Bierstadt and Frederic Remington.

40th anniversary of the Plains Indian Museum. Added to the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in 1979, the Plains Indian Museum promotes the art and traditions of Plains Indians through exhibits and innovative storytelling. The museum also sponsors the popular Plains Indian Powwow staged each June in the Robbie Powwow Garden adjacent to the museum.

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Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue has been performing in Cody for 15 years.

70th anniversary of completion of the LDS Chapel Rotunda, which houses the Cody Mural depicting the westward expansion of Mormon pioneers. Painted by artist Edward T. Grigware, the realistic painting was created off-site and then installed on the domed walls, measuring 36 feet in diameter and 18 feet high from the base to the peak of the ceiling.

115th anniversary of Pahaska Tepee, Buffalo Bill’s hunting lodge. Situated a short distance from the east entrance to Yellowstone National Park, Buffalo Bill Cody invited famous guests such as the Prince of Monaco to relax and hunt at this two-story hewn-log lodge. The lodge’s furniture and decorations have been carefully preserved, and visitors can explore the first floor for a small donation.

15th anniversary of Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue. Hailing from Nashville, singer Dan Miller and his talented Empty Saddles Band stage an hour-long dinner show in downtown Cody six nights a week during the summer.

Noteworthy events in Cody Yellowstone history:

150th anniversary of the Folsom-Cook-Peterson Expedition, the first successful expedition of Yellowstone National Park. Although the 1869 expedition was unofficial, the explorers’ reports ultimately prompted the Washburn Expedition the following year, which is largely credited with bringing Yellowstone the publicity which resulted in its establishment as the world’s first national park in 1872.

110th anniversary of the creation of Park County. Established by the Wyoming Legislature in 1909, Park County is the fifth-largest county in the state of Wyoming, encompassing 3,349,120 acres, and is the ninth most populous county, with a full-time population of around 9,500. The county is largely comprised of state and federal land.

120th anniversary of the Cody Enterprise. This twice-weekly, award-winning newspaper was founded by Buffalo Bill Cody and Col. John Peake in August 1999.

Wyoming anniversaries:

150th anniversary of Wyoming granting women the right to vote, becoming the first place in the country to legalize women’s suffrage. Wyoming, nicknamed “The Equality State,” is celebrating the 1889 anniversary with events throughout the year.

60th anniversary of the Hebgen Lake earthquake near West Yellowstone, Mont.Although the epi-center of this massive, mountain-moving quake was in Montana, its impact was broadly felt in Wyoming. The earthquake killed 28 campers and changed the geothermal plumbing systems of numerous geysers and hot springs throughout Yellowstone National Park.

100th anniversary of Lt. Col. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 72-vehicle cross-country road trip. The young Lt. Col. was charged with determining the state of the country’s roads across the country. The Wyoming portion of the trip, and discovery of abysmal conditions throughout the state (the convoy traveled at 5 miles per hour, on average), ultimately led to the development of the country’s Interstate road system, including I-80, which allows modern travelers to travel to Yellowstone in relative ease.

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Home of the Great American Adventure, Cody Yellowstone is comprised of the northwestern Wyoming towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. The region is known for rodeos, authentic guest and dude ranches, world-class museums and recreational adventures that reflect the adventurous spirit of the visionaries and explorers who brought the remote region to the world’s attention.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #ThatsWY

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

720-284-1512

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

 

Cody   Yellowstone   to   Give   Away   Trip   to   Celebrate   100th   Anniversary   of   Cody   Stampede

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The Cody Stampede features PRCA-sanctioned events.

 

CODY, Wyo., Oct. 19, 2018 – When the Rodeo Capital of the World celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Cody Stampede Rodeo next July, two lucky people will receive airfare, accommodations, VIP rodeo tickets, activities, rental car and a side trip to the world’s first national park courtesy of the town of Cody. Cody Yellowstone is comprised of the northwestern Wyoming towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

“To say we love our rodeo is an understatement,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “For a century the Cody Stampede has been part of the fabric of our community, and we look forward celebrating our 100th with the winners of our drawing.”

Travelers can enter the drawing online at www.codyyellowstone.org/win/. The drawing will be held April 15.

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Winners will stay three nights at the Irma Hotel.

Winners will arrive at the Cody Yellowstone Regional Airport July 2 and spend three nights at the historic Irma Hotel in downtown Cody. During the days they will enjoy Old Trail Town & Museum of the Old West, Wyoming River Trips, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Cody Firearms Experience, Cody Stampede Parade, City Park Wild West Extravaganza, Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center and the 100th Cody Stampede Rodeo Finals. Then it is off to Yellowstone National Park for a night at the famed Lake Yellowstone Hotel before returning to Cody and flying home July 6.

The trip is sponsored by the Park County Travel Council, Irma Hotel, Yellowstone National Park Lodges and Hertz.

 The Cody Stampede got its start when a group of local leaders met three years after the death of Buffalo Bill Cody to talk about how to transform the town’s small annual July 4 celebration into an event that would showcase Cody’s authentic Western dude ranches and other attractions as well as its proximity to two entrances to Yellowstone National Park.

These town leaders had little idea that they would create an annual event that would be enjoyed and remembered by generations of Cody residents and visitors from around the world.

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The Buffalo Bill Center of the West is comprised of five museums and is affiliated with the Smithsonian.

The modern Cody Stampede features four Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA)-sanctioned Stampede Rodeos, including a Cody/Yellowstone Extreme Bulls event typically held June 30.

The fun continues for the next four days with a Kiddies Parade, two Stampede Parades, daily rodeos, a 5K/10K run/walk on July 4, and the three-day Wild Extravaganza Craft Fair July 2-4.  Additionally, a variety of musical performances by regional acts are held in outdoor venues throughout town.

The Stampede Parades on July 3 and 4 are especially fun, with at least three marching bands from around the country parading down the town’s main street of Sheridan Avenue. The parade’s grand marshals have included well-known figures such as John Wayne, Steven Seagal, Chuck Yeager and Wilford Brimley.

Accommodations can be arranged at the inns, lodges, hotels and guest ranches offering more than 1,600 rooms.

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Home of the Great American Adventure, Cody Yellowstone is comprised of the northwestern Wyoming towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. The region is known for rodeos, authentic guest and dude ranches, world-class museums and recreational adventures that reflect the adventurous spirit of the visionaries and explorers who brought the remote region to the world’s attention.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry  #CodyWyoming  #CenteroftheWest  #BuffaloBill  #Yellowstone  #ThatsWY

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

720-284-1512

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

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Buffalo Bill Cody liked and supported the work of strong women.

Buffalo  Bill  Cody,  Champion  of  Women

CODY, Wyo., October 12, 2018 – “If a woman can do the same work that a man can do and do it just as well, she should have the same pay.” Those words were uttered 150 years ago by Col. William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, showman, scout, hunter and tourism visionary.

To many in the West – and all over the world – they were shocking words. When Cody said them, women in the United States and its territories couldn’t vote, own property or control their own earnings. Formal education was largely discouraged, and respectable women in the United States were expected to marry, produce children and run a household. That was pretty much it.

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Buffalo Bill Cody and community leader Caroline Lockhart.

Just one year later, in 1869, the Territory of Wyoming became the first place in the country to grant women the right to vote. One by one, states followed Wyoming’s lead,  but it would be another 51 years – three years after Buffalo Bill Cody’s death – before the 19th Amendment was passed, granting all women the right to vote. Cody would have been pleased.

“Though he was certainly a tough frontiersman oozing with masculinity and with a gift for swagger, he was also a reasonable, thoughtful, pragmatic man not prone to rhetoric,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the northwestern Wyoming region that includes Cody, the town Buffalo Bill founded. “He didn’t say women should be paid the same as men for the headlines. He said it because it’s what he believed, and his fair-mindedness was reflected in his employment practices and in the wages he paid.”

The female employees of the Wild West Show – and there were many, including stars like Annie Oakley and Calamity Jane as well as trick sidesaddle riders, sharpshooters, actors and support staff – were paid the same as their male counterparts. Female employees of later ventures, such as Agnes Chamberlin, editor of the newspaper he founded, the Cody Enterprise, were also treated equally.

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Annie Oakley was an integral part of the Wild West Show.

Historians believe that much of his progressive thinking about women’s rights was due to the influence of his mother Mary Ann, who was widowed when he was 11 and died when he was 18. While encouraging self-sufficiency – William went to work quickly to help support his mother and sisters – she also preached fairness. Teenage recklessness perhaps led him to join the Jayhawkers, a violent, militant gang that sought out fights with pro-slavery groups. Mary Ann forced him to leave the thuggish group, and a short time later, many of his one-time pals were killed in a raid.

Not surprisingly, Cody was also an advocate for fair treatment of American Indians and other ethnic and racial groups.

Given the thinking of its founder, the town of Cody has been shaped by many strong women since it was incorporated in 1896. Agnes Chamberlin went on to become owner and proprietress of the Chamberlin Inn, now a centrally located boutique hotel. Novelist and community leader Caroline Lockhart organized and presided over the Cody Stampede Rodeo, which celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2019. And philanthropist Nancy-Carroll Draper promoted the establishment of the Draper Natural History Museum, one of five museums that comprise the renowned Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

Nicknamed “The Equality State,” the Wyoming Tourism Office is planning a line-up of events and celebrations next year to mark the anniversary of Wyoming women’s suffrage including women-only trips, podcasts, photo exhibitions and more.

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Home of the Great American Adventure, Cody Yellowstone is comprised of the northwestern Wyoming towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. The region is known for rodeos, authentic guest and dude ranches, world-class museums and recreational adventures that reflect the adventurous spirit of the visionaries and explorers who brought the remote region to the world’s attention.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry  #CodyWyoming  #CenteroftheWest  #BuffaloBill  #Yellowstone  #ThatsWY

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

720-284-1512

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

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The region is renowned for its trout fishing.

Celebrating   Fall   in   Cody   Yellowstone   Country

 

CODY, Wyo., August 24, 2018– When fall comes to Cody Yellowstone Country, celebrations of the season take many forms. Artists paint fall landscapes. Cowboy crooners sing about the season’s beauty. Anglers cast about for perfect fishing spots. Bears fatten up on pine nuts. And rutting elk share their amorous intentions with the world by emitting wild, hair-raising bugles.

“Yellowstone in the fall is for mature audiences, and not just because of the R-rated behavior of some of our four-legged full-time residents,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the tourism marketing arm for Cody Yellowstone Country. “With kids back in school and many weeks of temperate weather left before winter comes, fall is a perfect time for adventurous adults to experience the authentic Western vibe of the region.”

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

Here’s what visitors to Yellowstone Country can expect in the fall:

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Buffalo Bill Cody’s influence is still evident throughout the region.

Western art. The most prestigious event of the year in Cody is Rendezvous Royale, a multi-day celebration of authentic Western art Sept. 17-22. Highlights of the week include online and live art auctions, workshops, showcases and a black-tie gala.

Wildlife. The forests, river valleys, mountains and canyons of Yellowstone Country are home to bears, elk, wolves, moose, bighorn sheep, bison, pronghorn, deer, eagles, river otters and many other mammals, birds and other species.

Blue-ribbon trout fishing. An abundance of top-flight fishing spots including North and South Forks of the Shoshone River and rivers and streams in Yellowstone National Park. Local fishing outfitters offer guides, maps and advice.

Fall bounty. Local and sustainable food offerings have continued to expand in Cody, and several restaurants and stores offer beef and bison from northwestern Wyoming ranchers and farmers as well as local produce, beer and wine.

Hiking. Yellowstone Country’s fall beauty can also be appreciated along its hiking trails, which are numerous throughout the region. Local favorites include the Bluebird Trail on Bureau of Land Management land five miles from town. Cedar Mountain Trail begins with a strenuous uphill climb, and hikers are rewarded with spectacular views from the summit. The Prickly Pear Trail is a paved walking trail that circles two lakes.

Rock climbing. The region is well-suited to climbing, with porous rock creating drainages and rock formations that appeal to climbers of all abilities. Conditions are typically good for rock climbing through October. Local outfitters lead classes and rock-climbing expeditions throughout the region.

Driving. Yellowstone Country road-tripping in the fall is a memorable way to enjoy fall color, with five scenic drives leading into Cody that take travelers past some of Wyoming’s most breathtaking valleys, mountain passes, rivers and forests.

History. The Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center at the site of the Heart Mountain Internment Camp offers a glimpse of the lives of some 14,000 Japanese-American citizens who were incarcerated there during World War II. Opened in August 2011, the center explores that difficult period of the country’s history with thoughtful exhibits that encourage visitors to ask the question “Could this happen today?”.

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Dan Miller entertains audiences with his Cowboy Music Revue.

More history. The storied life of the town’s founder, Colonel William Frederick Cody, is presented in the Buffalo Bill Museum, one of five museums that comprise the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. There are also museums dedicated to firearms, fine Western Art, the Plains Indians of the region and the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem.

Music. Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue continues its performances of cowboy music, poetry and comedy Monday through Saturday night through Sept 29. The Cody Cattle Company provides a casual evening at picnic tables with music and a chuckwagon dinner through Sept. 18.

Tours. The Cody Trolley Tours’ “Best of the West” tour is offered through Sept. 22. This informative one-hour tour covers 22 miles and helps orient visitors to where things are and what they might like to go back to see.

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Home of the Great American Adventure, Cody Yellowstone is comprised of the northwestern Wyoming towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. The region is known for rodeos, authentic guest and dude ranches, world-class museums and recreational adventures that reflect the adventurous spirit of the visionaries and explorers who brought the remote region to the world’s attention.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]


 

Six Fall Experiences You Can Only Have in Cody Yellowstone Country

 

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Bull elk are commonly seen in Wapiti Valley.

CODY, Wyo., August 21, 2018 – When fall comes to northwestern Wyoming’s Yellowstone Country, the rugged region transforms from a family vacation hot spot to an adventure-rich adult haven that is unlike anywhere else in the world.

“In the fall, families return to their school-year obligations and we welcome a more mature and adventurous crowd,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the tourism marketing arm of the region. “They come for the outdoor recreation, colorful landscapes and abundant culture and history. And because of the region’s authentic Wild West roots, our fall visitors are also sure to experience some quirky surprises as a vacation bonus.”

Founded by Buffalo Bill Cody in 1896, Cody is the only Yellowstone National Park gateway that opens to two park entrances – the east and northeast – and its location in a mountainous valley offers a rich array of outdoor adventures like blue-ribbon trout fishing, endless hiking, equestrian trails, rock climbing and scenic byways for road-tripping. The region also boasts  wildlife such as elk, bison, bears, wolves, moose, bighorn sheep, eagles, river otters and coyotes. Fall is mating season for many species, so it is common to see wildlife in action throughout the the region’s valleys and canyons, and sometimes even right along the road.

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Estelle Ishigo chose to stay at Heart Mountain during WWII with her husband.

Here are six fall adventures that travelers can have in Cody Yellowstone Country and nowhere else on Earth.

  • Hear an elk bugle in a valley that bears its name. Cody-based road-trippers enroute to the east entrance of Yellowstone will pass through Wapiti Valley. “Wapiti” is the Cree Indian word for elk, and these white-bottomed creatures from the deer family have obligingly continued to populate – and repopulate – their namesake valley. Fall is mating season, and elk take their procreation duties seriously.  Like the Instagramming humans who observe them, elk like to “share” their experiences too – by bugling about them. The shrill, ancient sound made by a male elk in rut reminds visitors in a goose bump-inducing way that Yellowstone Country remains one of the wildest places in the world.
  • Stop by Buffalo Bill’s hunting lodge and see a Crazy House, Chinese Wall and Colter’s Hell along the way. The Buffalo Bill Scenic Byway is a curious road-tripper’s dream route. Travelers pass a dilapidated, multi-story structure  – often called the

    Crazy House – that was the inexplicable passion of an obsessive local builder who died when he fell from one of the rickety balconies on a windy day. Along the route drivers will also pass rock formations with descriptive names like “Chinese Wall” and points of interest such as “Colter’s Hell.” Just outside the park entrance is Pahaksa Tepee, Buffalo Bill’s hunting lodge, where he entertained high-profile guests like the Prince of Monaco.

  • Fire an 1873 Winchester Rifle – the gun that Bill Cody used to hunt bison – and then buy one. The Cody Firearms Experience is an indoor shooting range with a selection of replicas of significant guns throughout history and a range of shooting packages. Just a short drive away is the Cody Firearms Museum, one of five museums under the roof of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. The museum is undergoing a major transformation this year, and it has partnered with Navy Arms and Winchester Firearms to recreate 200 Winchester Model 1873 lever-action rifles. A limited number are available for sale to benefit the museum.
  • See the poignant paintings of a Caucasian woman who was incarcerated at Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center. Choosing to remain with her Japanese-American husband when he and 14,000 Americans of Japanese descent were incarcerated
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    The Hole in the Wall Cabin at Old Trail Town.

    at this camp outside of Cody, Estelle Ishigo chronicled camp life in a series of sketches, drawing and watercolors.

  • See the Hole in the Wall Cabin and visit the bank Butch Cassidy refused to rob. One of the 26 authentic frontier buildings in Cody’s Old Trail Town was used as a hideout by Butch Cassidy and the notorious Wild Bunch during their train- and bank-robbing heyday. There was

    one bank in the region that was perfectly safe, though. Promising never to rob it, Butch Cassidy encouraged his friends to stash their cash at the Meeteetse Bank. Now part of the Meeteetse Museums, visitors can still view an original bank teller’s cage and other period artifacts.

  • Motor through valleys of plenty all in one day. In one long and visually stimulating day, travelers can pass through Yellowstone’s multiple wildlife-rich valleys including the park’s Hayden and Lamar Valleys; see a series of rugged mountain peaks; pass lakes, rivers and streams and see the waterfall that inspired the creation of the world’s first national park. By entering the park via the east entrance and exiting the northeast entrance to return to Cody, travelers can experience much of the 2.2 million-acre park’s most famous sights and landmarks all in one day.

 

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Home of the Great American Adventure, Cody Yellowstone is comprised of the northwestern Wyoming towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. The region is known for rodeos, authentic guest and dude ranches, world-class museums and recreational adventures that reflect the adventurous spirit of the visionaries and explorers who brought the remote region to the world’s attention.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone # Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]



 

Cody    Heritage    Museum    Joins    Impressive    List    of    Cultural    Attractions    in    Cody/Yellowstone    Country

 

CODY, Wyo., July 13, 2018 – With its grand opening July 19, the Cody Heritage Museum further strengthens the region’s standing of Cody/Yellowstone Country as a foremost destination of historical significance. The new museum focuses on the founding of the town of Cody, its history of ranching and agriculture, early businesses, the relationship with Yellowstone National Park, cowboys, rodeo and local families.

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Cody’s Heritage Museum will have its grand opening July 19.

“We are so fortunate to have so many high-quality museums,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “We sincerely welcome the Cody Heritage Museum, and we are all eager to check out the exhibits and to share Cody’s story.”

Located in the historic DeMaris house on Cody’s main drag of Sheridan Ave., the new museum is open 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays during the summer and by appointment on Saturdays and during the winter. Grand opening information can be found online.

Among the area’s museums are:

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

An affiliate of the Smithsonian, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West is a world-class facility featuring five museums under one roof. It was founded in 1917 to preserve the legacy and vision of Buffalo Bill Cody and is the oldest and most comprehensive museum of the American West. Its five museums are the Buffalo Bill Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney Western Art Museum, Cody Firearms Museum and the Draper Natural History Museum. The facility also includes the Harold McCracken Research Library.  The Center of the West is located in downtown Cody at 720 Sheridan Ave.

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The Powell Homesteader Museum is located in a building constructed of logs found near the east gate to Yellowstone National Park.

The Homesteader Museum

Located in nearby Powell, The Homesteader Museum celebrates a rich history with thousands of artifacts, historic buildings and photographs depicting the domestic, entrepreneurial and rugged homesteading life of the early Big Horn Basin pioneer. The museum is housed in a building built with logs from near the east gate to Yellowstone National Park for the American Legion in 1933, and the space has been used as a banquet and community dance hall, roller rink and teen center. During WWII it briefly housed German prisoners of war. The museum moved into the building in 1972. Original art deco chandeliers still hang from the beams.

Cody Dug Up Gun Museum

The Cody Dug Up Gun Museum in downtown Cody features more than  1,000 relic guns and other weapons found throughout the country and from many different time periods including the American Revolution, the Gold Rush Era, The United States  Civil War, the Old West and Indian Wars, World War I, The Roaring ‘20s and World War II. This free museum – donations are accepted – is a delightful combination of serious and whimsical that surprises many of its visitors with fascinating stories of lost and found.

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The Meeteetse Museum tells the story of the black-footed ferret, thought to be extinct until several were discovered in the area.

Meeteetse Museums

The town of Meeteetse features three museums under an umbrella organization that includes the Charles Belden Photography Museum, the Meeteetse Museum and the Bank Museum. The Belden Museum features the photographic works of Charles Belden, many  which document daily life on the Pitchfork Ranch from about 1914 through the early 1940s. The Belden Museum also showcases the personal memorabilia of the photographer and his family. The exhibit “Little Wahb, the Grizzly Bear” and the Olive Fell Gallery are also located there. Meeteetse Museum contains exhibits that tell the stories of wild sheep of North America, the black-footed ferret, the Forest Service Cabin, the Meeteetse Mercantile and the Saddle Room. Meeteetse Museum is also home to a number of important western sculptures by the late Harry Jackson. The Bank Museum is located in the newly restored First National Bank of Meeteetse, which served as Meeteetse’s bank from 1901 to 1975.

Old Trail Town/Museum of the West

Old Trail Town/Museum of the Old West is an enclave of more than two dozen authentic frontier buildings, including one used by Butch Cassidy and his infamous Hole-in-the-Wall Gang. The cabins were disassembled and reconstructed on the site of the original town of Cody to create an Old West main street, complete with a saloon, stores and residences.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone # Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

1Seven-Time   PRCA   Bullfighter   of   the   Year  –  and   Park County   Native   –   Dusty   Tuckness   to  be   Grand   Marshal   of   Cody   Stampede   Parade

 

CODY, Wyo., June 8, 2018 – Dusty Tuckness, seven-time Pro Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) Bullfighter of the Year and a native of Meeteetse, Wyo., will be the grand marshal of this year’s July 4 Cody Stampede Parade.

Tuckness joins a long list of distinguished grand marshals including John Wayne, Steven Seagal, Wilford Brimley, Red Steagall and Chuck Yeager. Last year actors Robert Taylor and Adam Bartley, who play Sheriff Walt Longmire and Deputy Archie “The Ferg” Ferguson in the A&E “Longmire” series, performed the honors.

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Champion bullfighter Dusty Tuckness will be the grand marshal of the Cody Stampede Parade.

July 4 is the fifth and final day of Cody’s annual birthday bash for the country, a 99-year tradition.

The celebration is called the Cody Stampede, and nearly every event – from the rodeos to the parades – reflects the equestrian heritage of this tiny northwestern Wyoming town. Horses have been a big part of Cody’s heritage ever since Buffalo Bill rode through this region and envisioned a town there.

This year’s events kick off on Saturday, June 30, with the Cody/Yellowstone Bull-Riding Event. The fun continues July 1 through July 4 with four Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA)-sanctioned Stampede Rodeos; a Kiddies Parade July 2; Stampede Parades July 3 and 4; a 5K/10K run/walk July 4; and the three-day Wild West Extravaganza Craft Fair July 2 – 4. There are also musical performances by regional acts in outdoor venues throughout town.

The Stampede Parade on the morning of July 4 is especially fun, with at least three marching bands from around the country parading down Sheridan Avenue, Cody’s main street.

Following the Cody Stampede Rodeo on July 4, Cody caps the annual celebration with the Cody Skylighters Fireworks Show.

The Start of the Stampede

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Tuckness joins a long line of distinguished grand marshals, include John Wayne.

In April 1920, a group of local leaders including a lawyer, dude ranch owner, newspaper editor and a publicity-savvy and nationally known female novelist met to talk about how to transform the town’s small annual July 4 celebration into an event that would showcase Cody’s authentic Western dude ranches and other attractions as well as its proximity to two entrances to Yellowstone National Park.

Among the most vocal of those leaders – and the only female present – was Caroline Lockhart, whose best-selling novels in the early 1900s had earned her fame and fortune. Once the group settled on naming the event the Cody Stampede and sketching a general framework, Lockhart took the reins as president. She set about publicizing it in the Park County Enterprise – Buffalo Bill’s newspaper, which was later renamed the Cody Enterprise, and is still in operation today. She also organized fundraisers and invited famous rodeo performers to demonstrate their skills at the nightly rodeos.

These town leaders had little idea that they would create an annual event that would be enjoyed and remembered by generations of Cody residents and visitors from around the world.

Visiting during the Cody Stampede

It is always a good idea for travelers to plan ahead if they want to experience the Cody Stampede. The town’s inns, lodges, hotels and guest ranches offer more than 1,600 rooms, and most of those sell out during the Cody Stampede.

Visitors will find an array of activities to keep them engaged when not enjoying Cody Stampede events. Among them, the Cody Heritage Museum, the Sleeping Giant Ski Area Zip Line, Cody Firearms Experience, Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue, Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Old Trail Town and the Cody Trolley Tour. There are also many outdoor adventures such as hiking, rock climbing fly fishing and whitewater rafting.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone # Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]

 


 

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Register  Now  for  2018  Heart  Mountain  Pilgrimage

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The pilgrimage includes a special exhibit featuring the artwork of Estelle Ishigo, a Caucasian woman who chose to join her Japanese-American husband in prison.

CODY, Wyo., June 4, 2018 – Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center is accepting registrations for the annual Heart Mountain Pilgrimage July 26-28. The weekend event includes an array of educational sessions, multigenerational discussions, film screening and other activities as well as a keynote speech by David Inoue, executive director of the Japanese American Citizens League.

Opened in 2011, the Interpretive Center is situated on the site of the Heart Mountain WW II Incarceration Camp where 14,000 Japanese-American citizens were imprisoned following the Pearl Harbor attack after President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, forcing the imprisonment of 120,000 American citizens of Japanese ancestry.

“During the war, there were more prisoners in the camp than the population of Cody, and the destination of Cody Yellowstone is forever linked to that black mark on our country’s past,” said Claudia Wade, executive director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “We believe that the best way to honor the thousands of people who were impacted by that executive order is to continue to study and reflect upon what happened here.”

The camp is located between Cody and Powell, Wyo., approximately 15 miles from downtown Cody.

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Sharon Yamato’s “Moving Walls” explores what happened to the barracks that housed prisoners.

Heart Mountain Pilgrimage attendees can choose from an array of sessions. For example, on Friday, July 27, participants can select from three educational sessions: “Memories of Heart Mountain,” moderated by former incarceree Sam Mihara; “The No-No By Music Projected,” a collaborative multi-media concert featuring original songs, stories and photos; and “Artifacts of Incarceration,” a collection of objects that tell stories of camp life. There will also be a film screening in Cody of Sharon Yamato’s “Moving Walls,” which explores what happened to the barracks that housed prisoners. Some were hurriedly sold to homesteading farmers for $1 as the government rushed to deconstruct the camp following the end of the war.

The pilgrimage also includes a special exhibit featuring the artwork of Estelle Ishigo, a Caucasian woman who chose to join her Japanese-American husband in prison rather than be separated.

Visit the Heart Mountain Pilgrimage website for more details.

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Cody/Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County called “Cody/Yellowstone Country” was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone # Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

[email protected]

[email protected]