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Ask Corrie: a visitors’ guide to Cody Yellowstone Country

March 21st, 2018 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

In just a couple of months, the streets of Cody’s Sheridan Avenue will be teeming with visitors from
around the world, and I can hardly wait. It is always thrilling when I hear so many different languages
spoken on our streets. It’s also great fun to chat with visitors from the East when it is their first trip to
the Western part of the country.

We locals often are asked a broad range of questions about our beloved little corner of Wyoming, and
we are always delighted to chat with our out-of- town guests. Here are some answers to common
questions:

Who is the most famous person to visit Cody?

Buffalo Bill Cody was the most famous man in the world when his Wild West Show was in full swing, so
even though he’s the town founder he’s also the most famous person to walk the streets. There have
been plenty of others. Ernest Hemingway stayed at the Chamberlin Inn down the street from the Irma
Hotel, and Buffalo Bill hosted the Prince of Monaco at Pahaska Tepee.

Pahaska what?

That’s the name of the hunting lodge Buffalo Bill built just outside the east entrance to Yellowstone. He
liked to host famous guests there. They’d hunt in the forest and fish in the Shoshone River during the
day.

How do you pronounce Shoshone River?

Shu-SHO- nee. Shoshone is also the name of the first federally protected national forest in the country.

What’s the best way to explore the Buffalo Bill Center of the West?

Take advantage of the pricing, which allows for two full consecutive days of exploration. There’s no way,at least in my experience, to do justice to this massive facility’s five museums. If you are planning to visit Yellowstone, be sure to stop at the Draper Museum of Natural History before you head to the park. With stellar interactive exhibits, the museum explores the ecology and natural history of Yellowstone National Park. The more you know about Yellowstone before you make the trip the better you’ll be able to appreciate the sights and sounds of the world’s first national park.

How do you pronounce Absaroka Range?

The Absaroka Mountain Range in the distance with green fields in the foreground on a sunny day

The Absaroka Range borders the eastern boundary of Yellowstone National Park.

The mountains that form the eastern border of Yellowstone National Park are pronounced Ab-SOR- kuh, although many travelers understandably try pronouncing it like it is spelled, Ab-su- ROKE-uh. The Absaroka Range is marked by the Beartooth Mountains to the north and the Wind River Range to the south.

Why is Sheridan Avenue such a wide street?

When Buffalo Bill Cody was plotting out the town, he made sure that the main streets were extra wide so it would be easy to turn around a horse and carriage.

What is the oldest building in Cody?

The home where Buffalo Bill Cody was born on a sunny day.

Buffalo Bill’s boyhood home is on display at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

The home where Buffalo Bill Cody grew up was moved from his birthplace, Le Claire, Iowa, to the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, and it can be viewed in the center’s Cashman Greever Garden outside the Buffalo Bill Museum. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The simple house was built in 1841, five years before William F. Cody was born.

What should I do if there are buffalo on the road?

Well first, we call them bison around here. Yes, I know it’s confusing because our town founder was called “Buffalo Bill.” Buffalo was the common but incorrect word used in Buffalo Bill’s day, but now we refer to them by their proper name, American bison. Back to your question. If you encounter a “bison jam,” relax, drive slowly and carefully and enjoy witnessing the power of nature as these massive animals lumber at their own pace down the road. A bison jam is an opportunity to see these powerful animals up close. Be ready to take some great vacation photos!

What happens if I encounter wildlife while hiking?

The National Park Service wants you to keep a safe distance of at least 25 yards from all animals and at least 50 yards from black and grizzly bears. This is good advice, and you should follow it. If you happen to find yourself too close to animals in the wild, back up quietly and quickly until you have returned to a safe distance. If you are hiking in the backcountry, meaning off the boardwalks and beyond the viewpoints, be sure to hike with others, and always carry bear spray.

Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston is buried in Old Trail Town and Robert Redford’s mountain man character was modeled after his life, but the movie called “Jeremiah Johnson”, not “Jeremiah Johnston.” Why?

The grave of Jeremiah Johnston, featuring a statue of Johnston riding a horse atop a stone monument.

Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston’s elaborate grave can be found at Old Trail Town. Sorry, but we just don’t know why Hollywood decided to make a movie about his life but call it “Jeremiah Johnson” instead of “Jeremiah Johnston.”

Yeah, I’ve always wondered about that myself. Sorry, you’ll have to ask Hollywood. And if you talk to Robert – “Bobby” to his friends – Redford, please tell him I said “Hey.”

Until next time, I’m loving life and looking forward to talking with visitors in Cody Yellowstone Country.


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