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Looking Forward to Fall

September 4th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

I have a friend who tends to become sad at the end of seasons, events, holidays, visits by out-of-town relatives, etc. People have commented that we are probably so close because I am the opposite. 

I did not view Labor Day Weekend as the end of the summer tourism season. Instead, I looked at it as the beginning of one of my favorite times here in Cody Yellowstone.

Summer is great, and nothing compares to families with wide-eyed kids taking in their first Great American Adventure to see geysers and rodeos, to eat the state’s best prime rib, to view true Western art, to wonder how people could live in those small one-room cabins.

Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center is always worth some extra time.

The atmosphere is noticeably different, however, when the empty nesters show up. Often these folks will take an extra day or two as they take a more leisurely approach to visit at all five of the museums in the Buffalo Bill Center of the West or stop and ponder over the exhibits at the Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center. They will dig a little deeper and check out the Dug Up Gun Museum or wander across the street Read More


Four things I love to do in the fall in...

August 16th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

When fall comes to Cody Yellowstone, the region is transformed from a family vacation hot spot to an adventure-rich adult haven that is unlike anywhere else in the world. This is the time of year when I spend more time savoring my favorite Cody Yellowstone adventures. Here are four of them.

Watching elk and other animals in the wild is another favorite fall pastime.

Wildlife-watching. Although I enjoy wildlife watching year-round, it is an especially thrilling adventure in the fall when the elk are bugling. Fall is mating season, and elk take their procreation duties seriously. Like the Instagramming humans who observe them, elk like to “share” their experiences too – by bugling about them. The shrill, ancient sound made by a male elk in rut reminds me in a goose bump-inducing way that this region is still one of the wildest places on Earth. 

Cody Yellowstone is especially fun to explore by foot.

Hiking. Yellowstone National Park is full of epic hiking trails ranging from easy strolls to heart-pounding climbs. No matter what kind of hike I’m up for, I find that hiking in Yellowstone is especially enjoyable when there are fewer people and cooler temperatures. I booked a room for Read More


Preparing for Over-the-Snow Travel

October 17th, 2018 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

When I lived in the big city the worlds of my friends and neighbors would come crashing down whenever a nearby road would be closed. Traffic would back up, and everyone would start comparing notes on the time it took to get to work, the time it took to get to the coffee shop, the time it took to listen to “Where Have All the Cowboys Gone?”

There are plenty in Cody.

My city friends were very protective of their time and plotted courses accordingly while I tended to think in terms of distance and alternative routes that had the best views. We learned from each other and developed an appreciation for both perspectives.

Snow coaches take visitors throughout the park. (Photo courtesy of National Park Service.)

When I explained that most of the roads in Yellowstone National Park close down every winter except for over-the-snow vehicles like snowmobiles and snow coaches my friends thought I was telling some Tall Tale of the West. Some of them also had to be convinced of the existence of hot water shooting up out of the ground and bubbling pools of mud.

Commercially guided snowmobile tours. (Photo courtesy of National Park Service.)

When October rolls around, we Read More


Dear Corrie – How to Enjoy Fall

September 14th, 2018 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Dear Corrie, I am what you call a “football widower.” My wife is the fan in our family, and she spends her Saturdays watching the college games and Sundays glued to the NFL. Now that Labor Day is in the rearview mirror, how do you recommend I spend my weekends?

— Lonely in the Fall

Dear Lonely,

I hate to break this to you, honey, but it’s time for you to “cowboy up” and learn to appreciate the Cowboys, Broncos and, of course, the Buffalo Bills. I understand, however, that the world is full of people who can only stay inside for so long. I’m one of them myself, and I love to get away from it all to stand in the river casting for trout. Contact one of our local outfitters for equipment, tips and guide service. Just don’t mention the Bears. They make a couple of the guides nervous.

Dear Corrie, My husband is from New England, and he is a bit of a snob about fall scenery. Now that we live out West, where can I take him to appreciate the colors?

— Missing the Maples

Dear Missing,

There’s more to fall than colorful leaves. Unless your husband has rocks in his head, he should check out our, well, rocks. Rock formations Read More


When Wyoming Women Rocked the Vote

September 11th, 2018 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Every November when I head to the polls, I give a quiet thanks to the all-male 1869 Wyoming territorial legislature that granted women the right to vote. In doing so, Wyoming became the first territory in the country to give suffrage to women.

I imagine the pride the women of the territory who populated the isolated Wyoming ranches, rough frontier towns and big, modern cities like Cheyenne must have felt as they went to the polls for the first time.

The story of how they earned that right is as wild and meandering as the Shoshone River on an early spring day, with elements of political gamesmanship, greed, bigotry and pragmatism. But mostly, it was because of love. Or lack of it. The miners, ranchers, railroad men, shopkeepers, cowboys and entrepreneurs of Wyoming were lonely. They needed wives, and there were only so many young, single teachers to go around.

Women of Wyoming were granted the right to vote in December 1869, long before their sisters in other parts of the country. The state will celebrate the 150th anniversary of the accomplishment throughout next year.

An uneducated but cagey and well-liked bigot named William Bright stars in this story. A saloonkeeper in the town Read More


Changing Seasons Means Changing Visitors

August 31st, 2018 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

End of summer has a different meaning to a lot of people.

Sticklers will tell you that the Autumnal Equinox marks the changing of seasons. Football fans can be a bit over-the-top with their arguments about whether fall begins with the first college or professional game of the season.

Here in the home of the Great American Adventure – Cody Yellowstone – there is a healthy contingent that goes into seasonal mourning after the final Cody Nite Rodeo is held.

For students, summer is over when school starts. Don’t get me started about the school year commencing before Labor Day; it’s just plain wrong.

Personally, I wave goodbye to summer the day after Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue calls it a wrap for the year. Don’t even try to get a hold of me on Sept. 30 as I will be curled up in a ball and feeling sorry for myself after the previous night’s finale.

When Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue shuts down for the season, certain people call it the end of summer.

Regardless, now that Labor Day is behind us we see a definite change on the streets, trails, streams and paths around here. There are fewer kids with just about all the schools back in session. We do see, Read More


Living the Local Life in Yellowstone Country

October 13th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Comments (2)

Here in Yellowstone Country, Monday is the best day of the week to shop. That’s when the Big Horn Basin Farmer’s Market is open, and those of us who like our food as fresh as the smell of a crisp autumn Wyoming day can find everything we need to prepare a week of healthy meals.

The market is located in Powell, a small town that is big on charm and rich in agricultural heritage. Powell has become a hub of agricultural tourism in the Yellowstone Country region because it has some of the most fertile ground for farming in the U.S. Named for John Wesley Powell, a well-known explorer and a proponent of Western land reclamation, the town’s agricultural success is due to the foresight of the U.S. Senate and the support of conservationists in the late 1800s. The area was authorized to be part of the Buffalo Bill Dam reclamation project, with irrigation waters transforming what was mostly sagebrush flats into rich irrigated farmland that soon became famous for the production of malting barley, beans, alfalfa, sunflowers and sugar beets. And it was also rich pasture land, allowing for a thriving cattle industry.

Powell remains an agricultural mecca today, and the Read More


Goodbye Summer, Hello Fall

September 28th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Fall has finally arrived here in Cody after an absolutely breathtaking and busy summer. In some ways it seems like yesterday that I was putting my flag up to celebrate Memorial Day weekend, but it also seems like a long time ago when I start thinking of everything I did and the people I met in a little over three months.

The biggest obstacle I face in summer is overextending myself. When someone suggests to me on a quiet Monday morning that we grab our cameras and head up the Wapiti Valley on Tuesday afternoon because several moose and grizzlies have been spotted near Sleeping Giant ski area, I immediately say yes.

Historic yellow buses are a great way to tour Yellowstone in the summer.

An early morning run to my favorite trout stream before the sun is too high? I’m there.

Taking an out-of-town visitor on a whirlwind tour of Yellowstone National Park is one of my favorite things in the world.

Next thing I know I’m booked solid and in danger of missing my favorite cowboy musician for the week. And I get grumpy if I go too long without hearing “It Takes a Whole Lotta Liquor to Like Her.”

So what do Read More


There’s a New Gang in Town…

September 14th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

And many of them have four legs. Every fall right after Labor Day, the population of Yellowstone Country sees a rather dramatic change.

Many of our revered attractions, like the cowboys who compete in the Cody Nite Rodeo and our local actors who perform in the nightly Cody Gunfighters show, have carefully packed away their saddles, trophies and costumes. I will continue to see the Cody Trolley for a couple of weeks as it takes visitors through our town on an entertaining hour-long trip. And Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue will continue to perform until Sept. 26. But most vacationers have returned to their homes, unpacked their bags and stored away their photos and mementos from their authentic Cody vacation.

Big Horn Sheep can be seen in the hills of East Yellowstone Valley.

But the population that doesn’t have to think about things like soccer practice and teacher conferences is still around, and this time of year, they like to show off.

When fall comes to Yellowstone Country, the wildlife come out to play. Don’t get me wrong. They’ve been there throughout the summer. Autumn, though, is the season when they are often most viewable from the road, and it’s the time of Read More


Corrie’s Cool Tips for Visiting Cody...

August 10th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Some like it hot, but I’m not one of them. And lately it’s been a little on the hot side around here, with daytime temperatures in the high 80s. I’m not complaining, because Corrie doesn’t complain. Just saying, well, baby, it’s hot outside.

In Yellowstone Country, however, even on the hottest of days there are plenty of things to do – outside and inside – to be cool and stay cool. Here are five ideas:

Enjoy the beauty of Yellowstone Country on horseback

Go for a trail ride. Most of our dude and guest ranches offer trail rides – short ones, long ones, overnight ones, multi-day ones. And many of the rides meander through forests of lodgepole pines, Englemann Spruces and Subalpine Firs, which offer shade from the sun. And the stunning beauty of Yellowstone Country is guaranteed to take your mind off the heat.

Paddle away an afternoon. Between Clark’s Fork River and the North Fork of the Shoshone River, there are plenty of paddling options, including whitewater rafting, family-friendly floating, duckie kayaking and core-busting stand-up paddle boarding (SUP).

Adventure out on one of five loop tours

Crank up the AC and go for a road trip. Yellowstone Country is home to numerous Read More