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Four things I love to do in the fall in...

August 16th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

When fall comes to Cody Yellowstone, the region is transformed from a family vacation hot spot to an adventure-rich adult haven that is unlike anywhere else in the world. This is the time of year when I spend more time savoring my favorite Cody Yellowstone adventures. Here are four of them.

Watching elk and other animals in the wild is another favorite fall pastime.

Wildlife-watching. Although I enjoy wildlife watching year-round, it is an especially thrilling adventure in the fall when the elk are bugling. Fall is mating season, and elk take their procreation duties seriously. Like the Instagramming humans who observe them, elk like to “share” their experiences too – by bugling about them. The shrill, ancient sound made by a male elk in rut reminds me in a goose bump-inducing way that this region is still one of the wildest places on Earth. 

Cody Yellowstone is especially fun to explore by foot.

Hiking. Yellowstone National Park is full of epic hiking trails ranging from easy strolls to heart-pounding climbs. No matter what kind of hike I’m up for, I find that hiking in Yellowstone is especially enjoyable when there are fewer people and cooler temperatures. I booked a room for Read More


Why I have Problems Binge Watching Television

August 6th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

There are times I wish I could sit down and binge watch a series on Netflix, Prime, Hulu or whatever else is out there.

I’ve enjoyed watching episodes of many shows, and some appeal to my sometimes-warped sense of humor. Tony Soprano meeting a friend or rival in front of the Lou Costello Memorial statue made me laugh for days. Better Call Saul is full of subtle references that made me back up and play over because I knew I missed something and wanted to know what it was.

There really is a Lou Costello Memorial Park.

The kids on Stranger Things remind me of my youth, and not just because the soundtrack features favorites like Madonna and Weird Al Yankovic. You know, the giants that were huge influences during my formative years.

The problem is I will start watching a show and something will happen that makes me turn off the television and head out the door. Halfway through an episode of Friends and I was on my way to Rawhide Coffee for a cup of joe. Same thing happened when I tried to watch Twin Peaks.

I loved Bill Bryson’s book A Walk in the Woods, but the movie, not so much. Read More


Midsummer Dreaming

August 1st, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

There is an ongoing argument among some of the locals who are often found hanging out in the lounge at the Irma. They can bend your ear to the point of breaking while they present their cases why summer starts A)June 21 or B)Memorial Day weekend.

The Irma’s cherrywood bar is the site of many a spirited discussion.

On one hand we had the “summer-lasts-from-Memorial-Day-to-Labor-Day” faction that fondly remembered their childhood summers as uninterrupted stretches of swimming, ballplaying and marshmallow toasting. They never got bored or annoyed with their friends, and they always listened to their mothers. 

Their counterparts insisted on summer starting the moment of the solstice on or about June 21 and ending on the Autumnal equinox three months later. 

I got suckered into their discussion once and realized after I bought one round – but before they could stick me with a second – that they were having fun and snaring unsuspecting people like me in their trap. One of their tricks is to turn the discussion to what constitutes “Mid-Summer.” If summer starts Memorial Day, then the midway point is roughly July 15. According to the purists, August 6 marks halfway through the summer.

After some good-natured name calling and Read More


The Talented Hands of Cody

July 19th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

It’s amazing what can be done with 14 phalanges, eight carpals and five metacarpals, especially if those phalanges, carpals and metacarpals are located in Cody, Wyoming. 

That’s what I was thinking as I strolled through the gallery at the new By Western Hands Gallery & Museum, perusing the functional furniture creations of a hand-picked, exclusive group of regional craftspeople who adhere to Western design traditions. These artists use materials like burled logs and American Indian patterns to create distinctive furniture and art that does more than just look pretty. The poker table and grandfather clock are out of my price range, but maybe that beaded pillow would be a good accent in the Corrie N. Cody house. Some day.

This dollhouse showcases the work of many of the region’s artists and can be seen at By Western Hands Gallery and Museum.

My small town on the eastern edge of Yellowstone happens to have many ultra-talented residents who create magic with their bare hands. 

Dan Miller, Hannah Miller and Wendy Corr perform Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue throughout the summer.

Take the musical hands of Dan Miller, Hannah Miller and Wendy Corr as they perform Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue six nights a week Read More


Quieting Down? Not Even Close

July 9th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Even though we weren’t root, root rooting for our team, the just-completed Cody Stampede always feels like Homecoming Weekend to us here in Cody Yellowstone.

And considering this was our centennial celebration there were more familiar faces than normal along the parade route, in the stands at rodeo, on the dance floor at Cassie’s, bellied up to the bars at the Silver Dollar and Pat O’Haras. 

I had to laugh when some new friends who moved here this spring commented that once the Stampede was done things would quiet down. They did not realize that our summer would hum along for quite a while and that many of our attractions are either open just for the summer or host most of their guests during the traditional vacation months when school is out.

Here are some of my suggestions for activities you should check out before the end of summer:

Experience the rodeo. The Cody Nite Rodeo is often travelers’ first rodeo experience. Open nightly from June 1 through August 31, the rodeo features riders, ropers, bull riders and bronc busters from all over the country.  Watch the wacky Wild Bunch perform a “gunfight” with a gun safety message. The place to be on summer evenings Read More

The Mystery of Buffalo Bill Cody’s Two...

July 3rd, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Most people only get one grave, but Buffalo Bill Cody always the showman, has two. That’s what I explained to my friends from Denver as we drove by Cedar Mountain, or Spirit Mountain as the locals call it. 

My friends had visited the Buffalo Bill Museum and Grave on Lookout Mountain just outside of Denver. That is where most people believe Buffalo Bill Cody is buried. 

Like many Cody locals, though, I’m not so sure. There are some in Cody and elsewhere who believe that Buffalo Bill is in fact buried in an unmarked grave on Spirit Mountain overlooking the town he built, just as he had once written in his will.

Like many residents of Cody, Corrie thinks Buffalo Bill is buried on top of Cody’s Spirit Mountain, overlooking the town he built.

What gives? The story of Buffalo Bill’s two graves includes enough intrigue for a full-length movie and involves a bold plan, a middle-of the-night trip to a Denver mortuary, an unlucky ranch hand bearing a likeness to Buffalo Bill and a passionate group of riled-up townspeople in mourning for their beloved town founder after his death in Denver on Jan. 10, 1917. 

No one disputes the manner and location of Read More


June Means New Activities, Including Rafting

June 17th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

So much happens here in Cody Yellowstone when June arrives.

The lights go on at the rodeo grounds, and the Cody Nite Rodeo starts entertaining visitors and introducing new generations to bull riding, calf roping, barrel racing and Dolly Parton jokes.

The Cody Gunfighters put on a play that is equal parts shoot-em-up, gun safety and “photo opps.”

Dan Miller and his Cowboy Music Revue combine terrific acoustic music with Western humor and the occasional dash of cowboy poetry.

The dude and guest ranches saddle up the horses, bake the beans and remind parents that there aren’t apps for the things that truly bring families together.

Many people have taken their first ride at a dude or guest ranch in Cody/Yellowstone.

A common theme I hear on my near-daily jaunts down Sheridan Avenue is that people want to try new activities. More people than I can count have cast their first flies on one of our lakes or rivers. The biggest thrill for folks from Florida is often finding a patch of snow and throwing a snowball in June. Shopping for a cowboy hat is a new experience for those not old enough to remember when Urban Cowboy came out.

The region is known Read More


Welcome Back, Cody Yellowstone Visitors

June 5th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Welcome back, summer visitors. We missed you here in Cody Yellowstone, and we can’t wait to show what we have in store for you.

This week, many of you will be arriving in your Subarus, Suburbans, RVs and tour buses. You’ll be bringing the kids, the dogs, the parents, the cousins, the friends. You’ll have your coolers, binoculars, rain jackets and cowboy hats. Some of you will be celebrating the end of the school year. Others will be actively avoiding office emails, with the admirable intention of using those vacation days to their fullest.

Cody Yellowstone has plenty in store for visitors this summer.

Those of us who live and work here year-round have been eagerly awaiting your arrival. We’ve spent the winter restocking, rehearsing and revising. It has seemed like an especially long winter, not just here, but also in Chicago, Denver, Oklahoma City, Salt Lake, Cleveland and Boise. For awhile there, I thought those winter winds would blow all the way to Memorial Day. All it takes, though is one day of sunshine and warmth – a day exactly like it is today – and a caravan of travelers making their way down Sheridan Avenue to nudge me Read More


I’m Volunteering at By Western Hands....

May 14th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

When I was a kid I remember my parents jumping in to help friends and neighbors when a big job came up.

One time the couple next door decided to lay down sod in their front yard. As they started to pick up those heavy rolls and unroll them, you could hear the doors open and shut as one neighbor after another showed up to help. In less than a half hour, some 10 people had completed what would have been a long, hot and backbreaking job for two people.

Scenes like that were common. Nobody expected a direct or immediate payback. We all knew that the day would come when someone needed help and that somebody else would step up.

In my family this attitude was not confined to laying sod, changing tires or nailing up sheetrock. We would volunteer to take tickets at fundraisers at the Center of the West, sell hot dogs at the high school sporting events, wash Dan Miller’s car and help the staff at the hospital. Okay, just kidding about Dan. He can wash his own car.

Combine my parents’ example with our newest attraction in town, and you knew I would be first in line Read More


The East Gate is Open

May 8th, 2019 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

If you remember my “Corrie Calendar” you know that I have this strange, mystical and almost creepy ability to tell what the date is – sorta, kinda – based upon weird factors. Just as the smell of leaves burning tells some people to turn on the television to watch college football, I know that roof racks full of skis and snow boards signals the opening of Sleeping Giant and hunting season is upon us when men in fashionable orange clothing are chowing down at the Proud Cut.

And a historic yellow bus heading into town from the direction of the Buffalo Bill Dam means that the East Gate of Yellowstone National Park is open.

Most of the roads inside the park are closed to regular wheeled vehicles during the winter. You can drive from Gardner, Mont. to Mammoth Hot Springs to Roosevelt Lodge and then east through Lamar Valley to Cooke City, Mont. where the road is closed again. The rest of the park roads are open only to over-the-snow vehicles such as snowmobiles and snow coaches. Many of the tracked vehicles, including the famed Bombardiers, have been replaced the past few years by fun modern coaches with oversized tires.

The Lake Yellowstone Hotel is always worth a visit.

So much of Yellowstone Read More